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dc.contributor.authorMidander, Klara
dc.contributor.authorCronholm, Pontus
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Hanna L.
dc.contributor.authorElihn, Karine
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Lennart
dc.contributor.authorLeygraf, Christofer
dc.contributor.authorWallinder, Inger Odnevall
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-20T11:38:27Z
dc.date.available2009-08-20T11:38:27Z
dc.date.issued2009-03
dc.identifier.citationSmall 2009, 5 (3):389-399en
dc.identifier.issn1613-6829
dc.identifier.pmid19148889
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/smll.200801220
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/77966
dc.description.abstractAn interdisciplinary and multianalytical research effort is undertaken to assess the toxic aspects of thoroughly characterized nano- and micrometer-sized particles of oxidized metallic copper and copper(II) oxide in contact with cultivated lung cells, as well as copper release in relevant media. All particles, except micrometer-sized Cu, release more copper in serum-containing cell medium (supplemented Dulbecco's minimal essential medium) compared to identical exposures in phosphate-buffered saline. Sonication of particles for dispersion prior to exposure has a large effect on the initial copper release from Cu nanoparticles. A clear size-dependent effect is observed from both a copper release and a toxicity perspective. In agreement with greater released amounts of copper per quantity of particles from the nanometer-sized particles compared to the micrometer-sized particles, the nanometer particles cause a higher degree of DNA damage (single-strand breaks) and cause a significantly higher percentage of cell death compared to cytotoxicity induced by micrometer-sized particles. Cytotoxic effects related to the released copper fraction are found to be significantly lower than the effects related to particles. No DNA damage is induced by the released copper fraction.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121638933/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0en
dc.subjectcopperen
dc.subjectcytotoxicityen
dc.subjectDNA damageen
dc.subjectnanoparticlesen
dc.subjectparticle characterizationen
dc.subject.meshCell Line
dc.subject.meshCopper
dc.subject.meshDNA Damage
dc.subject.meshMetal Nanoparticles
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanning
dc.subject.meshSpectrophotometry, Atomic
dc.subject.meshSurface Properties
dc.titleSurface characteristics, copper release, and toxicity of nano- and micrometer-sized copper and copper(II) oxide particles: a cross-disciplinary study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSmall (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany)en
html.description.abstractAn interdisciplinary and multianalytical research effort is undertaken to assess the toxic aspects of thoroughly characterized nano- and micrometer-sized particles of oxidized metallic copper and copper(II) oxide in contact with cultivated lung cells, as well as copper release in relevant media. All particles, except micrometer-sized Cu, release more copper in serum-containing cell medium (supplemented Dulbecco's minimal essential medium) compared to identical exposures in phosphate-buffered saline. Sonication of particles for dispersion prior to exposure has a large effect on the initial copper release from Cu nanoparticles. A clear size-dependent effect is observed from both a copper release and a toxicity perspective. In agreement with greater released amounts of copper per quantity of particles from the nanometer-sized particles compared to the micrometer-sized particles, the nanometer particles cause a higher degree of DNA damage (single-strand breaks) and cause a significantly higher percentage of cell death compared to cytotoxicity induced by micrometer-sized particles. Cytotoxic effects related to the released copper fraction are found to be significantly lower than the effects related to particles. No DNA damage is induced by the released copper fraction.


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