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dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Catherine M
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ling-Wei
dc.contributor.authorHeude, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorBernard, Jonathan Y
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Nicholas C
dc.contributor.authorDuijts, Liesbeth
dc.contributor.authorMensink-Bout, Sara M
dc.contributor.authorPolanska, Kinga
dc.contributor.authorMancano, Giulia
dc.contributor.authorSuderman, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorShivappa, Nitin
dc.contributor.authorHébert, James R
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-30T10:31:24Z
dc.date.available2019-08-30T10:31:24Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-12
dc.identifier.citationNutrients 2019, 11(8), 1873en_US
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.pmid31408965
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu11081873
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/618314
dc.description.abstractThere are over 1,000,000 publications on diet and health and over 480,000 references on inflammation in the National Library of Medicine database. In addition, there have now been over 30,000 peer-reviewed articles published on the relationship between diet, inflammation, and health outcomes. Based on this voluminous literature, it is now recognized that low-grade, chronic systemic inflammation is associated with most non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancers, respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders, as well as impaired neurodevelopment and adverse mental health outcomes. Dietary components modulate inflammatory status. In recent years, the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®), a literature-derived dietary index, was developed to characterize the inflammatory potential of habitual diet. Subsequently, a large and rapidly growing body of research investigating associations between dietary inflammatory potential, determined by the DII, and risk of a wide range of NCDs has emerged. In this narrative review, we examine the current state of the science regarding relationships between the DII and cancer, cardiometabolic, respiratory and musculoskeletal diseases, neurodevelopment, and adverse mental health outcomes. We synthesize the findings from recent studies, discuss potential underlying mechanisms, and look to the future regarding novel applications of the adult and children's DII (C-DII) scores and new avenues of investigation in this field of nutritional research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/8/1873/htmen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectbone healthen_US
dc.subjectcanceren_US
dc.subjectcardiometabolic healthen_US
dc.subjectdietary inflammatory indexen_US
dc.subjectinflammationen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectmetabolic syndromeen_US
dc.subjectneurodevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectobesityen_US
dc.subjectrespiratory healthen_US
dc.titleDietary Inflammatory Index and Non-Communicable Disease Risk: A Narrative Review.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNofer Institute of Occupational Medicineen_US
dc.identifier.journalNUTRIENTSen_US
dc.source.journaltitleNutrients
refterms.dateFOA2019-08-30T10:31:25Z


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Attribution 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 3.0 United States