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dc.contributor.authorGromadzinska, Jolanta
dc.contributor.authorPolanska, Kinga
dc.contributor.authorKozlowska, Lucyna
dc.contributor.authorMikolajewska, Karolina
dc.contributor.authorStelmach, Iwona
dc.contributor.authorJerzyńska, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorStelmach, Włodzimierz
dc.contributor.authorGrzesiak, Mariusz
dc.contributor.authorHanke, Wojciech
dc.contributor.authorWasowicz, Wojciech
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-05T10:08:23Z
dc.date.available2018-12-05T10:08:23Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationInt J Environ Res Public Health 2018, 15 (6) art: E1245.en
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.pmid29895780
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph15061245
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/618253
dc.description.abstractEpidemiological studies have suggested an association between maternal antioxidant levels during pregnancy and development of allergic diseases in their offspring. The aim of the study was to determine plasma vitamins A and E concentration in the 1st trimester of pregnancy, at delivery and in cord blood and to search for a relationship with allergy in up to 2-year-old children who were prenatally exposed or not exposed to tobacco smoke. The study participants included 252 mother-child pairs from Polish Mother and Child Cohort. Vitamin concentrations were measured using the HPLC-UV method, smoking status—as saliva cotinine level using the HPLC-MS/MS technique. Children’s health status was assessed using a questionnaire and pediatricians/allergists examination. Cord plasma vitamin concentrations were significantly lower than their levels in maternal plasma in the 1sttrimester and at delivery (p < 0.001). Significantly higher concentrations of vitamin E have been shown to occur during the 1st trimester of pregnancy in plasma of the women who have actively/passively smoked cigarettes compared to the non-smokers (p < 0.02). Multivariate analysis with inclusion of a variety of confounding factors have not indicated any statistically significant associations between β-carotene, vitamins A and E and the risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis and wheezing in their children up to 2 years of age. The interaction between smoking during pregnancy and vitamins levels on the risk of allergy was not statistically significant (p < 0.4). The relationship between plasma concentration of vitamins A and E, and the risk of allergy in their young children has not been demonstrated.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/6/1245en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of environmental research and public healthen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectdermalen
dc.subjectrespiratory and food allergyen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectpregnancyen
dc.subjectsmokingen
dc.subjectvitamins A, Een
dc.subjectβ-caroteneen
dc.titleVitamins A and E during Pregnancy and Allergy Symptoms in an Early Childhood-Lack of Association with Tobacco Smoke Exposure.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNofer Institute of Occupational Medicineen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-17T18:12:33Z
html.description.abstractEpidemiological studies have suggested an association between maternal antioxidant levels during pregnancy and development of allergic diseases in their offspring. The aim of the study was to determine plasma vitamins A and E concentration in the 1st trimester of pregnancy, at delivery and in cord blood and to search for a relationship with allergy in up to 2-year-old children who were prenatally exposed or not exposed to tobacco smoke. The study participants included 252 mother-child pairs from Polish Mother and Child Cohort. Vitamin concentrations were measured using the HPLC-UV method, smoking status—as saliva cotinine level using the HPLC-MS/MS technique. Children’s health status was assessed using a questionnaire and pediatricians/allergists examination. Cord plasma vitamin concentrations were significantly lower than their levels in maternal plasma in the 1sttrimester and at delivery (p < 0.001). Significantly higher concentrations of vitamin E have been shown to occur during the 1st trimester of pregnancy in plasma of the women who have actively/passively smoked cigarettes compared to the non-smokers (p < 0.02). Multivariate analysis with inclusion of a variety of confounding factors have not indicated any statistically significant associations between β-carotene, vitamins A and E and the risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis and wheezing in their children up to 2 years of age. The interaction between smoking during pregnancy and vitamins levels on the risk of allergy was not statistically significant (p < 0.4). The relationship between plasma concentration of vitamins A and E, and the risk of allergy in their young children has not been demonstrated.


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Archived with thanks to International journal of environmental research and public health
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Archived with thanks to International journal of environmental research and public health