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dc.contributor.authorSteck, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorField, R. William
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-30T07:18:59Z
dc.date.available2009-03-30T07:18:59Z
dc.date.issued2006-04
dc.identifier.citationJ. Toxicol. Environ. Health Part A 2006, 69 (7):655-664en
dc.identifier.issn1528-7394
dc.identifier.pmid16608831
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15287390500261141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/57753
dc.descriptionKEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;analysis;Air Pollutants;Air Pollutants,Radioactive;Air Pollution,Indoor;biomarkers of exposure & effect: validation;Biological Markers;cancer epidemiology;Carcinogens;Carcinogens,Environmental;Dose-Response Relationship,Radiation;epidemiology;etiology;Environmental Exposure;Housing;Humans;Lung Neoplasms;Minnesota;Neoplasms,Radiation-Induced;Radon;Research;Risk Assessment;
dc.description.abstractRadon concentration alone may not be an adequate surrogate to measure for lung cancer risk in all residential radon epidemiologic lung cancer studies. The dose delivered to the lungs per unit radon exposure can vary significantly with exposure conditions. These dose-effectiveness variations can be comparable to spatial and temporal factor variations in many situations. New technologies that use surface-deposited and implanted radon progeny activities make more accurate dose estimates available for future epidemiologic studies.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/15287390500261141en
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants, Radioactive
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution, Indoor
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers
dc.subject.meshCarcinogens, Environmental
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure
dc.subject.meshHousing
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced
dc.subject.meshRadon
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment
dc.titleDosimetric challenges for residential radon epidemiology.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of toxicology and environmental health. Part Aen
html.description.abstractRadon concentration alone may not be an adequate surrogate to measure for lung cancer risk in all residential radon epidemiologic lung cancer studies. The dose delivered to the lungs per unit radon exposure can vary significantly with exposure conditions. These dose-effectiveness variations can be comparable to spatial and temporal factor variations in many situations. New technologies that use surface-deposited and implanted radon progeny activities make more accurate dose estimates available for future epidemiologic studies.


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