• Air Pollution and Human Sperm Sex Ratio.

      Radwan, Michał; Dziewirska, Emila; Radwan, Paweł; Jakubowski, Lucjusz; Hanke, Wojciech; Jurewicz, Joanna; Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland (2018-01-01)
      The present study was designed to address the hypothesis that exposure to specific air pollutants may impact human sperm Y:X chromosome ratio. The study population consisted of 195 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 15-300 mln/ml (WHO, 2010). Participants represented a subset of men in a multicenter parent study conducted in Poland to evaluate environmental factors and male fertility. Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The Y:X ratio was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Air quality data were obtained from the AirBase database. In multivariate analysis the significant reduction was observed in the proportion of Y/X chromosome bearing sperm and exposure to particulate matter >10 μm in aerodynamic diameter PM10( p = .009) and particulate matter <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter PM2.5( p = .023). The observed effects of a lower Y:X sperm chromosome ratio among men exposed to air pollution support the evidence that the trend of declining sex ratio in several societies over past decades has been due to exposure to air pollution; however due to limited data on this issue, the obtained results should be confirmed in longitudinal studies.
    • Dietary Patterns and Their Relationship With Semen Quality.

      Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Michał; Sobala, Wojciech; Radwan, Paweł; Bochenek, Michał; Hanke, Wojciech; Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (2018-05)
      Diet is a complex exposure variable, which calls for multiple approaches to examine the relationship between diet and disease risk. To address these issues, several authors have recently proposed studying overall dietary patterns by considering how foods and nutrients are consumed in combinations. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between dietary patterns, semen quality parameters, and the level of reproductive hormones. The study population consisted of 336 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20 to 300 mln/ml or slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 mln/ml). Participants were interviewed, and a semen sample was provided by them. Diet was assessed via food frequency questionnaire, and dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis. Men were classified into three groups according to scores of each dietary pattern: Western, Mixed, or Prudent. A positive association was observed between sperm concentration and Prudent dietary pattern, and level of testosterone and Prudent dietary pattern ( p = .05, p = .03, respectively). Additionally, Prudent dietary pattern was identified to decrease the DNA fragmentation index ( p = .05). The results were adjusted for sexual abstinence, age, smoking, past diseases, and alcohol consumption. Higher consumption of a Prudent dietary pattern was associated with higher sperm concentration and higher level of testosterone. Sperm chromatin structure was inversely related to higher consumption of a Prudent dietary pattern. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and extend these results to other populations.
    • Environmental levels of triclosan and male fertility.

      Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Michał; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Kałużny, Paweł; Klimowska, Anna; Radwan, Paweł; Hanke, Wojciech; Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland (2017-12-07)
      Triclosan is a synthetic chemical with broad antimicrobial activity that has been used extensively in consumer products, including personal care products, textiles, and plastic kitchenware, although the exposure which is widespread evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between triclosan exposure and male fertility. Triclosan (TCS) urinary concentrations were measured using gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in 315 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic with normal sperm concentration (≥ 15 mln/ml) (WHO 2010) under 45 years of age. Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. TCS was detected in 84.13% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 2.83 μg/l (2.57 μg/g creatinine). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a positive association between the urinary concentrations of triclosan 50th-75th percentile and ≥ 50 percentile and percentage of sperm with abnormal morphology (p = 0.016 and p = 0.002, respectively). The study provides evidence that exposure to triclosan is associated with poorer semen quality. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.
    • Human Semen Quality, Sperm DNA Damage, and the Level of Urinary Concentrations of 1N and TCPY, the Biomarkers of Nonpersistent Insecticides.

      Dziewirska, Emila; Radwan, Michał; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Klimowska, Anna; Radwan, Paweł; Kałużny, Paweł; Hanke, Wojciech; Słodki, Maciej; Jurewicz, Joanna; Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (2019)
      The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between environmental exposure to nonpersistent insecticides and semen quality (concentration, motility, morphology, computer-aided semen analysis [CASA] parameters, and sperm DNA damage). Urine samples (n = 315) collected from men who attended the infertility clinic with normal semen concentration of 15 to 300 mln/ml and age under 45 years were analyzed for two metabolites (1-naphthol [1N] and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol [TCPY]) of nonpersistent insecticides. Participants provided semen, blood, and saliva samples; additionally, men filled a detailed questionnaire. The results identified that urinary TCPY concentration was significantly associated with a decrease in motility; also there was a positive association between TCPY and DNA fragmentation index (DFI). 1N concentration was negatively associated with a percentage of sperm with normal morphology and positively with one of the CASA parameters (curvilinear velocity [VCL]). The results suggest that environmental exposure to nonpersistent insecticides may have an impact on semen quality parameters and sperm DNA damage.
    • Urinary Bisphenol A Levels and Male Fertility.

      Radwan, Michał; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Dziewirska, Emila; Radwan, Paweł; Kałużny, Paweł; Klimowska, Anna; Hanke, Wojciech; Jurewicz, Joanna; Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (2018-11)
      Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical found in many consumer products. BPA is a suspected potent endocrine disruptor, with endocrine-disrupting properties demonstrated in animal studies. Few human studies have examined bisphenol A exposure in relation to male fertility and, results are divergent. The aim of the study is to examine the associations between urinary BPA concentration and male fertility. Bisphenol A urinary concentrations were measured using gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in 315 men under 45 years of age with normal sperm concentration (⩾15 mln/ml) recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. BPA was detected in 98.10% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 1.87 µg/l (1.63 µg/ g creatinine). A multiple linear regression analysis identified a positive association between the urinary concentrations of bisphenol A 25th-50th percentile and total sperm sex chromosome disomy ( p = .004). Also when modeled as continuous variable urinary BPA concentration increased total sperm sex chromosome disomy ( p = .01). Urinary concentration of BPA also increase the percentage of immature sperm (HDS) ( p = .018) and decrease motility ( p = .03). The study provides evidence that exposure to BPA is associated with poorer semen quality. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.