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dc.contributor.authorIshikawa, Hitoshi
dc.contributor.authorIshikawa, Takashi
dc.contributor.authorMiyatsu, Yu
dc.contributor.authorKurihara, Kazuo
dc.contributor.authorFukao, Akira
dc.contributor.authorYokoyama, Kazuhito
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-03T11:59:50Z
dc.date.available2009-03-03T11:59:50Z
dc.date.issued2006-07-25
dc.identifier.citationMutat. Res. 2006, 599 (1-2):135-143en
dc.identifier.issn0027-5107
dc.identifier.pmid16580699
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2006.02.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/51775
dc.descriptionBiomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studiesBiomarker (including alleles if genetic): MN and MTHFR C677T, A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, TYMS 3'UTR polymorphismsEffect studied (phenotype/pathology): DNA damage and reduced enzymatic activityTissue/biological material/sample size: bloodMethod of analysis: cytokinesis-block methodStudy design: cross-sectional Study size: 32 healthy Japanese menImpact on outcome (including dose-response): AA genotype for MTRR had higher MN frequency that those with AG genotype (p<0.05).Lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkersLifestyle element evaluated: smoking statusOutcome studied (cancer or cancer biomarker): genetic damageMethod of biomarker analysis: cytokinesis-block methodStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): humansStudy design (if human): cross-sectionalStudy size (if human): 32 healthy Japanese menImpact on outcome: MN frequencies of the never smokers (n=49), former-smokers(n=24) and current smokers (n=59) (2.84 vs 3 vs 3.71, p=0.37) Keywords classification: 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase;adverse effects;Adult;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;biomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studies;DNA Damage;enzymology;Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase;genetics;Genotype;Humans;Japan;Lymphocytes;metabolism;Male;Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2);Micronucleus Tests;Middle Aged;Occupational Medicine;Polymorphism,Genetic;Public Health;Smoking;Thymidylate Synthase;en
dc.description.abstractThe cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke has been evaluated as one of many potential confounders in a large number of biomonitoring studies of occupationally or environmentally exposed populations and control subjects. Despite the well-known presence of carcinogens in the cigarette smoke, the results in the scientific literature linking smoking habits to micronuclei (MN) frequency, one of the cytogenetic markers, are rather controversial. Here, we investigated the relationships among MN frequency, smoking habits and five folate metabolic enzyme gene polymorphisms (MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G and TYMS 3'UTR) in 132 healthy Japanese men who were non-habitual drinkers. In never- and former-smokers, no statistically significant differences in the mean MN frequencies were observed according to the five folate metabolic enzyme gene polymorphisms. In current-smokers, however, subjects with the AA genotype for MTRR had a significantly higher mean MN frequency than the AG genotypes for MTRR (p<0.05). Furthermore, among subjects with the AA genotype for MTRR, current-smokers were found to have a significantly higher mean MN frequency than never- and former-smokers (p<0.05). To further characterize this association, we stratified the smoking status into five groups: non-smokers (never-smokers and former-smokers), 1-10 cigarettes/day, 11-20 cigarettes/day, 21-30 cigarettes/day and >or=31 cigarettes/day. There was an overall trend for the mean MN frequency in subjects with the MTRR AA genotype to increase as the number of cigarettes smoked per day increased (p<0.01, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). The results of our preliminary study suggest that the MTRR AA genotype acts to increase the MN frequency resulting from cigarette smoking. Therefore, studies on human genotoxicity based on cytogenetic markers of MN should take into account both the MTRR polymorphism and the potential confounding effect of smoking, although these preliminary findings need to be validated in larger populations because of the relatively small sample size.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T2C-4JKYWRP-2&_user=1843694&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000055040&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1843694&md5=3340a4ea39b946e48e70c80debe5febeen
dc.subjectSmokingen
dc.subjectMicronucleien
dc.subjectFolateen
dc.subjectPolymorphismen
dc.subject.mesh5-Methyltetrahydrofolate-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshDNA Damage
dc.subject.meshFerredoxin-NADP Reductase
dc.subject.meshGenotype
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLymphocytes
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMethylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)
dc.subject.meshMicronucleus Tests
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic
dc.subject.meshSmoking
dc.subject.meshThymidylate Synthase
dc.titleA polymorphism of the methionine synthase reductase gene increases chromosomal damage in peripheral lymphocytes in smokers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMutation researchen
html.description.abstractThe cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke has been evaluated as one of many potential confounders in a large number of biomonitoring studies of occupationally or environmentally exposed populations and control subjects. Despite the well-known presence of carcinogens in the cigarette smoke, the results in the scientific literature linking smoking habits to micronuclei (MN) frequency, one of the cytogenetic markers, are rather controversial. Here, we investigated the relationships among MN frequency, smoking habits and five folate metabolic enzyme gene polymorphisms (MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G and TYMS 3'UTR) in 132 healthy Japanese men who were non-habitual drinkers. In never- and former-smokers, no statistically significant differences in the mean MN frequencies were observed according to the five folate metabolic enzyme gene polymorphisms. In current-smokers, however, subjects with the AA genotype for MTRR had a significantly higher mean MN frequency than the AG genotypes for MTRR (p<0.05). Furthermore, among subjects with the AA genotype for MTRR, current-smokers were found to have a significantly higher mean MN frequency than never- and former-smokers (p<0.05). To further characterize this association, we stratified the smoking status into five groups: non-smokers (never-smokers and former-smokers), 1-10 cigarettes/day, 11-20 cigarettes/day, 21-30 cigarettes/day and >or=31 cigarettes/day. There was an overall trend for the mean MN frequency in subjects with the MTRR AA genotype to increase as the number of cigarettes smoked per day increased (p<0.01, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). The results of our preliminary study suggest that the MTRR AA genotype acts to increase the MN frequency resulting from cigarette smoking. Therefore, studies on human genotoxicity based on cytogenetic markers of MN should take into account both the MTRR polymorphism and the potential confounding effect of smoking, although these preliminary findings need to be validated in larger populations because of the relatively small sample size.


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