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dc.contributor.authorLow, Yen-Ling
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, James I.
dc.contributor.authorGrace, Philip B.
dc.contributor.authorMulligan, Angela A.
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Ailsa A.
dc.contributor.authorScollen, Serena
dc.contributor.authorDunning, Alison M.
dc.contributor.authorLuben, Robert N.
dc.contributor.authorKhaw, Kay-Tee
dc.contributor.authorDay, Nick E.
dc.contributor.authorWareham, Nick J.
dc.contributor.authorBingham, Sheila A.
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-02T12:26:30Z
dc.date.available2009-03-02T12:26:30Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationNutr Cancer 2006, 56 (1):31-39.en
dc.identifier.issn0163-5581
dc.identifier.pmid17176215
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/s15327914nc5601_5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/51433
dc.descriptionBiomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studiesBiomarker: single-nucleotide polymorphisms in COMT, CYP19, ESR1, and SHBG genesEffect studied: cancer riskTissue/biological material/sample size: urine, bloodMethod of analysis: genotypingStudy design: nested case-control studyStudy size: 89 cases and 178 controlsImpact on outcome (including dose-response): Odds ratios for phytoestrogen exposure, as assessed using the four methods, were not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.15-0.94). Men with the CC genotype for the ESRI PvuII polymorphism had significantly higher risk for prostate cancer compared with men with the TT genotype [adjusted odds ratio = 4.65 (1.60-13.49); P = 0.005].en
dc.description.abstractProspective phytoestrogen exposure was assessed using both biomarkers and estimates of intake in 89 British men recruited into the Norfolk arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, men who subsequently developed prostate cancer. Results were compared with those from 178 healthy men matched by age and date of recruitment. Levels of seven phytoestrogens (daidzein, genistein, glycitein, O-desmethylangolensin, equol, enterodiol, and enterolactone) were measured in spot urine and serum samples. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in COMT, CYP19, ESR1, and SHBG genes were genotyped. Urinary levels of all phytoestrogens correlated strongly with serum levels. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.63 (glycitein) to 0.88 (daidzein) (P < 0.001). Urinary and serum levels correlated significantly with isoflavone intake assessed from food diaries (R = 0.15-0.20; P < 0.05) but not with that from a food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios for phytoestrogen exposure, as assessed using the four methods, were not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.15-0.94). Men with the CC genotype for the ESRI PvuII polymorphism had significantly higher risk for prostate cancer compared with men with the TT genotype [adjusted odds ratio = 4.65 (1.60-13.49); P = 0.005]. Our results utilizing a combined prospective exposure provide no evidence that phytoestrogens alter prostate cancer risk in British men, whereas the C allele for the PvuII polymorphism may be associated with increased risk.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a785829405~db=all~order=pageen
dc.subjectadministration & dosageen
dc.subjectageden
dc.subjectAllelesen
dc.subjectanalysisen
dc.subjectbiological markersen
dc.subjectbiomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studiesen
dc.subjectblooden
dc.subjectcancer epidemiologyen
dc.subjectdieten
dc.subjectdietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkersen
dc.subjectepidemiologyen
dc.subjectfield studiesen
dc.subjectgeneticen
dc.subjectgeneticsen
dc.subjectgenotypeen
dc.subjecthumanen
dc.subjectmaleen
dc.subjectmetabolismen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectOdds Ratioen
dc.subjectPhytoestrogensen
dc.subjectPolymorphism,Single Nucleotideen
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subjectProstatic Neoplasmsen
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.subjectrisk factorsen
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.subjecturineen
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers
dc.subject.meshDiet
dc.subject.meshGenotype
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio
dc.subject.meshPhytoestrogens
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotide
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshUnited States
dc.titlePhytoestrogen exposure, polymorphisms in COMT, CYP19, ESR1, and SHBG genes, and their associations with prostate cancer risk.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNutrition and canceren
html.description.abstractProspective phytoestrogen exposure was assessed using both biomarkers and estimates of intake in 89 British men recruited into the Norfolk arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, men who subsequently developed prostate cancer. Results were compared with those from 178 healthy men matched by age and date of recruitment. Levels of seven phytoestrogens (daidzein, genistein, glycitein, O-desmethylangolensin, equol, enterodiol, and enterolactone) were measured in spot urine and serum samples. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in COMT, CYP19, ESR1, and SHBG genes were genotyped. Urinary levels of all phytoestrogens correlated strongly with serum levels. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.63 (glycitein) to 0.88 (daidzein) (P < 0.001). Urinary and serum levels correlated significantly with isoflavone intake assessed from food diaries (R = 0.15-0.20; P < 0.05) but not with that from a food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios for phytoestrogen exposure, as assessed using the four methods, were not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.15-0.94). Men with the CC genotype for the ESRI PvuII polymorphism had significantly higher risk for prostate cancer compared with men with the TT genotype [adjusted odds ratio = 4.65 (1.60-13.49); P = 0.005]. Our results utilizing a combined prospective exposure provide no evidence that phytoestrogens alter prostate cancer risk in British men, whereas the C allele for the PvuII polymorphism may be associated with increased risk.


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