Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSacerdote, Carlotta
dc.contributor.authorMatullo, Giuseppe
dc.contributor.authorPolidoro, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorGamberini, Sara
dc.contributor.authorPiazza, Alberto
dc.contributor.authorKaragas, Margaret R.
dc.contributor.authorRolle, Luigi
dc.contributor.authorDe Stefanis, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorCasetta, Giovanni
dc.contributor.authorMorabito, Francesco
dc.contributor.authorVineis, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorGuarrera, Simonetta
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-24T07:18:36Z
dc.date.available2008-09-24T07:18:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-07
dc.identifier.citationMutagenesis 2007, 22 (4):281-285en
dc.identifier.issn0267-8357
dc.identifier.pmid17515441
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mutage/gem014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/38073
dc.description.abstractThe objective is to investigate the relationships between fruit and vegetable intake, DNA repair gene polymorphisms and the risk of bladder cancer. We have analyzed a hospital-based case-control study of 266 individuals with incident, histologically confirmed bladder cancer diagnosed between 1994 and 2003. Controls (n = 193) were patients treated for benign diseases recruited daily in a random fashion from the same hospital as the cases. All cases and controls were interviewed face-to-face for major risk factors, along fruit and vegetable consumption. Odds ratios (ORs) for fruit and vegetable intake and DNA repair gene polymorphisms were adjusted for age and smoking status, using unconditional logistic regression. A statistically significant decreased risk was observed for fruit and vegetable intake above median (versus below the median) [unadjusted OR 0.61, confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.50-0.96 and OR 0.54, CI 95% 0.39-0.80, respectively]; the decreased risk persisted after adjustment for age and cigarette smoking (OR 0.73, CI 95% 0.49-1.01 and OR 0.86, CI 95% 0.56-1.08, respectively). The fruits and vegetables associated with decreased risks included leafy green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, apples and citrus fruits. We did not find any interactions between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and fruit and vegetable intake. This study found a reduced risk associated with fruit and vegetable intake. No interaction was observed between fruit and vegetable consumption and DNA repair gene polymorphisms.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper was made possible by a grant from the Compagnia di San Paolo (Turin, Italy; P.V.) and of the Associazione Italiana per le Ricerche sul Cancro (G.M.). P.V. and G.M. are partially funded by Environmental Cancer Risk Nutrition and Individual Suspectibility, a network of excellence operating within the European Union sixth Framework Program, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (Contract No. 513943).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/22/4/281en
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAnticarcinogenic Agents
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
dc.subject.meshDNA Repair
dc.subject.meshDiet
dc.subject.meshEating
dc.subject.meshFruit
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshItaly
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshVegetables
dc.titleIntake of fruits and vegetables and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes in bladder cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMutagenesisen
html.description.abstractThe objective is to investigate the relationships between fruit and vegetable intake, DNA repair gene polymorphisms and the risk of bladder cancer. We have analyzed a hospital-based case-control study of 266 individuals with incident, histologically confirmed bladder cancer diagnosed between 1994 and 2003. Controls (n = 193) were patients treated for benign diseases recruited daily in a random fashion from the same hospital as the cases. All cases and controls were interviewed face-to-face for major risk factors, along fruit and vegetable consumption. Odds ratios (ORs) for fruit and vegetable intake and DNA repair gene polymorphisms were adjusted for age and smoking status, using unconditional logistic regression. A statistically significant decreased risk was observed for fruit and vegetable intake above median (versus below the median) [unadjusted OR 0.61, confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.50-0.96 and OR 0.54, CI 95% 0.39-0.80, respectively]; the decreased risk persisted after adjustment for age and cigarette smoking (OR 0.73, CI 95% 0.49-1.01 and OR 0.86, CI 95% 0.56-1.08, respectively). The fruits and vegetables associated with decreased risks included leafy green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, apples and citrus fruits. We did not find any interactions between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and fruit and vegetable intake. This study found a reduced risk associated with fruit and vegetable intake. No interaction was observed between fruit and vegetable consumption and DNA repair gene polymorphisms.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Articles
    Articles of researchers from ECNIS Network of Excellence

Show simple item record