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dc.contributor.authorUlmius, Matilda
dc.contributor.authorJohansson-Persson, Anna
dc.contributor.authorKrogh, Morten
dc.contributor.authorOlsson, Peter
dc.contributor.authorOnning, Gunilla
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-04T12:29:02Z
dc.date.available2012-07-04T12:29:02Z
dc.date.issued2011-11
dc.identifier.citationGenes Nutr. 2011, 6 (4):429-439en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1555-8932
dc.identifier.pmid21594609
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12263-011-0236-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/232111
dc.description.abstractThe understanding of how fibre-rich meals regulate molecular events at a gene level is limited. This pilot study aimed to investigate changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects after consumption of an oat bran-rich meal. Fifteen subjects (8 men and 7 women, aged 20-28 years) ingested meals with oat bran or a control meal after an overnight fast. Blood samples for analysis of postprandial glucose, insulin and triglyceride concentrations were taken during 3 h, while PBMCs for microarray gene expression profiling from five men and five women were taken before and 2 h after the meal. Analysis of transcriptome data was performed with linear mixed models to determine differentially expressed genes in response either to meal intake or meal content, and enrichment analysis was used to identify functional gene sets responding to meal intake and specifically to oat bran intake. Meal intake as such affected gene expression for genes mainly involved in metabolic stress; indicating increased inflammation due to the switch from fasting to fed state. The oat bran meal affected gene sets associated with a lower insulin level, compared with the control meal. The gene sets included genes involved in insulin secretion and β-cell development, but also protein synthesis and genes related to cancer diseases. The oat bran meal also significantly lowered postprandial blood insulin IAUC compared to control. Further studies are needed to compare these acute effects with the long-term health effects of oat bran.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the European Network of Excellence NuGO (The European Nutrigenomics Organisation), the Nordic Centre of Excellence in Systems biology in controlled dietary interventions and cohort studies (SYSDIET) and a VINNOVA grant (project number 2004-02285).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/06x1p0002p25127j/?MUD=MPen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3197843/?tool=pubmeden_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Genes & nutritionen_GB
dc.subjectOatsen_GB
dc.subjectGene Expressionen_GB
dc.subjectPeripheral mononuclear blood cellsen_GB
dc.subjectPostprandial responseen_GB
dc.titleAn oat bran meal influences blood insulin levels and related gene sets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy subjects.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalGenes & Nutritionen_GB
html.description.abstractThe understanding of how fibre-rich meals regulate molecular events at a gene level is limited. This pilot study aimed to investigate changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects after consumption of an oat bran-rich meal. Fifteen subjects (8 men and 7 women, aged 20-28 years) ingested meals with oat bran or a control meal after an overnight fast. Blood samples for analysis of postprandial glucose, insulin and triglyceride concentrations were taken during 3 h, while PBMCs for microarray gene expression profiling from five men and five women were taken before and 2 h after the meal. Analysis of transcriptome data was performed with linear mixed models to determine differentially expressed genes in response either to meal intake or meal content, and enrichment analysis was used to identify functional gene sets responding to meal intake and specifically to oat bran intake. Meal intake as such affected gene expression for genes mainly involved in metabolic stress; indicating increased inflammation due to the switch from fasting to fed state. The oat bran meal affected gene sets associated with a lower insulin level, compared with the control meal. The gene sets included genes involved in insulin secretion and β-cell development, but also protein synthesis and genes related to cancer diseases. The oat bran meal also significantly lowered postprandial blood insulin IAUC compared to control. Further studies are needed to compare these acute effects with the long-term health effects of oat bran.


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