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dc.contributor.authorKotova, Natalia
dc.contributor.authorJuren, Tina
dc.contributor.authorMyohanen, Kirsi
dc.contributor.authorCornelius, Michael
dc.contributor.authorAbramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
dc.contributor.authorBackman, Josefin
dc.contributor.authorMenzel, Ulrike
dc.contributor.authorRydberg, Per
dc.contributor.authorKronberg, Leif
dc.contributor.authorVahakangas, Kirsi
dc.contributor.authorSegerback, Dan
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-08T13:05:57Z
dc.date.available2011-12-08T13:05:57Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-10
dc.identifier.citationToxicol. Lett. 2011, 207 (1):18-24en
dc.identifier.issn1879-3169
dc.identifier.pmid21878374
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.toxlet.2011.08.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/196511
dc.description.abstractAcrylamide (AA) is produced in many types of food products cooked or processed at high temperature. AA is metabolized to the epoxide glycidamide (GA), which can bind to deoxyguanosine and deoxyadenosine in DNA. The GA-derived N7-guanine and N3-adenine adducts are the only products which so far have been analysed in vivo. Because of previous excellent experience from analysis of adducts to N1-adenine, the aim of our study was to investigate if the N1-adenine adduct of GA could be used as a biomarker of AA exposure. A ³²P-postlabelling method was developed and tested (a) on DNA modified in vitro with GA, (b) on cells treated with GA and (c) on liver DNA from mice treated with AA. The N1-adenine adduct of GA (analysed after conversion to N⁶-GA-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate) was easily detected in DNA reacted with GA and in DNA from cells exposed to GA, but not in DNA from mice treated with AA. The reason for this is currently not clearly understood, but some of the possible contributing factors are discussed. The application of the method in other experimental conditions should be further pursued in order to solve this matter.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank Cecilia Lundin and Tove Sandberg for their help in the laboratory work. Finnish Cultural Foundation, Nordforsk, Paavo Koistinen Foundation, Kuopio University Foundation, University of Kuopio and the EU projects HEATOX (FOOD-CT- 2003-506820), NewGeneris (FOOD-CT-2005-016320) and ECNIS (CT-2005-513943) have financed the studies. The sponsors of this study played no role in it other than funding.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378427411014810en
dc.subjectDNA adductsen
dc.subjectAcrylamideen
dc.subjectGlycidamideen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subject32P-postlabellingen
dc.subject.meshAcrylamideen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCHO Cellsen
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquiden
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen
dc.subject.meshCricetulusen
dc.subject.meshDNA Adductsen
dc.subject.meshDeoxyadenosinesen
dc.subject.meshEpoxy Compoundsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLeukocytes, Mononuclearen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshSpectrophotometry, Ultravioleten
dc.title³²P-HPLC analysis of N1-(2-carboxy-2-hydroxyethyl)deoxyadenosine: a DNA adduct of the acrylamide-derived epoxide glycidamide.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalToxicology Lettersen
html.description.abstractAcrylamide (AA) is produced in many types of food products cooked or processed at high temperature. AA is metabolized to the epoxide glycidamide (GA), which can bind to deoxyguanosine and deoxyadenosine in DNA. The GA-derived N7-guanine and N3-adenine adducts are the only products which so far have been analysed in vivo. Because of previous excellent experience from analysis of adducts to N1-adenine, the aim of our study was to investigate if the N1-adenine adduct of GA could be used as a biomarker of AA exposure. A ³²P-postlabelling method was developed and tested (a) on DNA modified in vitro with GA, (b) on cells treated with GA and (c) on liver DNA from mice treated with AA. The N1-adenine adduct of GA (analysed after conversion to N⁶-GA-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate) was easily detected in DNA reacted with GA and in DNA from cells exposed to GA, but not in DNA from mice treated with AA. The reason for this is currently not clearly understood, but some of the possible contributing factors are discussed. The application of the method in other experimental conditions should be further pursued in order to solve this matter.


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