Dietary intake of meat and meat-derived heterocyclic aromatic amines and their correlation with DNA adducts in female breast tissue.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/82654
Title:
Dietary intake of meat and meat-derived heterocyclic aromatic amines and their correlation with DNA adducts in female breast tissue.
Authors:
Rohrmann, Sabine; Lukas Jung, Sea-Uck; Linseisen, Jakob; Pfau, Wolfgang
Abstract:
It was the aim of this study to examine the association of the consumption of meat in general, meat prepared by different cooking methods and the dietary intake of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA) with the level of DNA adducts in the breast tissue of women undergoing reduction mammoplasty. Dietary intake of meat and HCA were assessed via questionnaire in 44 women undergoing reduction mammoplasty. DNA adduct analysis in breast tissue was performed by (32)P-postlabelling analysis. Spearman rank correlation coefficients (r) were calculated to examine the association of meat consumption and dietary HCA intake with tissue DNA adduct levels. A median DNA adduct level of 18.45 (interquartile range 12.81-25.65) per 10(9) nucleotides in breast tissue was observed; median HCA intake was 40.43 ng/day (interquartile range 19.55-102.33 ng/day). Total HCA intake (r = 0.33, P = 0.03), consumption of fried meat (r = 0.39, P = 0.01), beef (r = 0.32, P = 0.03) and processed meat (r = 0.51, P = 0.0004) were statistically significantly correlated with the level of DNA adducts in breast tissue. The detected DNA adducts could not be confirmed to be specific HCA-derived DNA adducts by comparison with external standards, using the (32)P-postlabelling assay. We observed strong correlations of dietary HCA intake and consumption of fried and processed meat with DNA adduct levels in breast tissue of 44 women. Since the detected DNA adducts were not necessarily specific only for HCA, it is possible that HCA intake is a surrogate of other genotoxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in meat prepared at high temperatures.
Citation:
Mutagenesis 2009, 24 (2):127-132
Journal:
Mutagenesis
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/82654
DOI:
10.1093/mutage/gen058
PubMed ID:
18980957
Additional Links:
http://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/24/2/127
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-3804
Sponsors:
Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility, a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (Contract No 513943).
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRohrmann, Sabineen
dc.contributor.authorLukas Jung, Sea-Ucken
dc.contributor.authorLinseisen, Jakoben
dc.contributor.authorPfau, Wolfgangen
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-25T09:15:23Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-25T09:15:23Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-
dc.identifier.citationMutagenesis 2009, 24 (2):127-132en
dc.identifier.issn1464-3804-
dc.identifier.pmid18980957-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mutage/gen058-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/82654-
dc.description.abstractIt was the aim of this study to examine the association of the consumption of meat in general, meat prepared by different cooking methods and the dietary intake of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA) with the level of DNA adducts in the breast tissue of women undergoing reduction mammoplasty. Dietary intake of meat and HCA were assessed via questionnaire in 44 women undergoing reduction mammoplasty. DNA adduct analysis in breast tissue was performed by (32)P-postlabelling analysis. Spearman rank correlation coefficients (r) were calculated to examine the association of meat consumption and dietary HCA intake with tissue DNA adduct levels. A median DNA adduct level of 18.45 (interquartile range 12.81-25.65) per 10(9) nucleotides in breast tissue was observed; median HCA intake was 40.43 ng/day (interquartile range 19.55-102.33 ng/day). Total HCA intake (r = 0.33, P = 0.03), consumption of fried meat (r = 0.39, P = 0.01), beef (r = 0.32, P = 0.03) and processed meat (r = 0.51, P = 0.0004) were statistically significantly correlated with the level of DNA adducts in breast tissue. The detected DNA adducts could not be confirmed to be specific HCA-derived DNA adducts by comparison with external standards, using the (32)P-postlabelling assay. We observed strong correlations of dietary HCA intake and consumption of fried and processed meat with DNA adduct levels in breast tissue of 44 women. Since the detected DNA adducts were not necessarily specific only for HCA, it is possible that HCA intake is a surrogate of other genotoxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in meat prepared at high temperatures.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEnvironmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility, a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (Contract No 513943).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/24/2/127en
dc.subjectAutoradiographyen
dc.subjectBreasten
dc.subjectDNA Adductsen
dc.subjectHeterocyclic Compoundsen
dc.subjectMammaplastyen
dc.subjectMeaten
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAmines-
dc.subject.meshAutoradiography-
dc.subject.meshBreast-
dc.subject.meshDNA Adducts-
dc.subject.meshDiet-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHeterocyclic Compounds-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMammaplasty-
dc.subject.meshMeat-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.titleDietary intake of meat and meat-derived heterocyclic aromatic amines and their correlation with DNA adducts in female breast tissue.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMutagenesisen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in ECNIS-NIOM are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.