4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides in the urine of infants exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/69693
Title:
4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides in the urine of infants exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.
Authors:
Hecht, Stephen S.; Carmella, Steven G.; Le, Ky-Anh; Murphy, Sharon E.; Boettcher, Angela J.; Le, Chap; Koopmeiners, Joseph; An, Larry; Hennrikus, Deborah J.
Abstract:
Biomarkers of carcinogen uptake could provide important information pertinent to the question of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in childhood and cancer development later in life. Previous studies have focused on exposures before birth and during childhood, but carcinogen uptake from ETS in infants has not been reported. Exposures in infants could be higher than in children or adults because of their proximity to parents who smoke. Therefore, we quantified 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL) in the urine of 144 infants, ages 3 to 12 months, who lived in homes with parents who smoked. Total NNAL is an accepted biomarker of uptake of the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone. Cotinine and its glucuronide (total cotinine) and nicotine and its glucuronide (total nicotine) were also quantified. Total NNAL was detectable in 67 of 144 infants (46.5%). Mean levels of total NNAL in the 144 infants were 0.083 +/- 0.200 pmol/mL, whereas those of total cotinine and total nicotine were 0.133 +/- 0.190 and 0.069 +/- 0.102 nmol/mL, respectively. The number of cigarettes smoked per week in the home or car by any family member when the infant was present was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) when NNAL was detected than when it was not (76.0 +/- 88.1 versus 27.1 +/- 38.2). The mean level of NNAL detected in the urine of these infants was higher than in most other field studies of ETS exposure. The results of this study show substantial uptake of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone in infants exposed to ETS and support the concept that persistent ETS exposure in childhood could be related to cancer later in life.
Citation:
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 2006, 15 (5):988-992
Journal:
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Issue Date:
May-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/69693
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0596
PubMed ID:
16702381
Additional Links:
http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/full/15/5/988
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Biomarker: 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL)Exposure/effect represented: environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) / total NNAL in the urine Study design: cross-sectional study. Study size: 144 infants. Analytical technique: LC-ESI-MS/MS; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring (model 6890 gas chromatograph equipped with an autosampler and model 5973 Mass Selective Detector; Hewlett Packard, Palo Alto, CA)Tissue/biological material/sample size: urineImpact on outcome (including dose-response): Total NNAL was detectable in 67 of 144 infants (46.5%). Mean levels of total NNAL in the 144 infants were 0.083 +/- 0.200 pmol/mL, whereas those of total cotinine and total nicotine were 0.133 +/- 0.190 and 0.069 +/- 0.102 nmol/mL, respectively. The number of cigarettes smoked per week in the home or car by any family member when the infant was present was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) when NNAL was detected than when it was not (76.0 +/- 88.1 versus 27.1 +/- 38.2). The mean level of NNAL detected in the urine of these infants was higher than in most other field studies of ETS exposure. KEYWORD CLASSIFICATION: Agriculture;analysis;Biological Markers;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;Chromatography,High Pressure Liquid;Cotinine;Creatinine;Female;field studies;Food;Glucuronides;Humans;Infant;Male;Minnesota;Mothers;Nicotine;Nitrosamines;Research;Smoke;Statistics,Nonparametric;Tobacco;Tobacco Smoke Pollution;urine;
ISSN:
1055-9965
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHecht, Stephen S.-
dc.contributor.authorCarmella, Steven G.-
dc.contributor.authorLe, Ky-Anh-
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Sharon E.-
dc.contributor.authorBoettcher, Angela J.-
dc.contributor.authorLe, Chap-
dc.contributor.authorKoopmeiners, Joseph-
dc.contributor.authorAn, Larry-
dc.contributor.authorHennrikus, Deborah J.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-04T07:44:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-04T07:44:06Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-
dc.identifier.citationCancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 2006, 15 (5):988-992en
dc.identifier.issn1055-9965-
dc.identifier.pmid16702381-
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0596-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/69693-
dc.descriptionBiomarker: 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL)Exposure/effect represented: environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) / total NNAL in the urine Study design: cross-sectional study. Study size: 144 infants. Analytical technique: LC-ESI-MS/MS; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring (model 6890 gas chromatograph equipped with an autosampler and model 5973 Mass Selective Detector; Hewlett Packard, Palo Alto, CA)Tissue/biological material/sample size: urineImpact on outcome (including dose-response): Total NNAL was detectable in 67 of 144 infants (46.5%). Mean levels of total NNAL in the 144 infants were 0.083 +/- 0.200 pmol/mL, whereas those of total cotinine and total nicotine were 0.133 +/- 0.190 and 0.069 +/- 0.102 nmol/mL, respectively. The number of cigarettes smoked per week in the home or car by any family member when the infant was present was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) when NNAL was detected than when it was not (76.0 +/- 88.1 versus 27.1 +/- 38.2). The mean level of NNAL detected in the urine of these infants was higher than in most other field studies of ETS exposure. KEYWORD CLASSIFICATION: Agriculture;analysis;Biological Markers;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;Chromatography,High Pressure Liquid;Cotinine;Creatinine;Female;field studies;Food;Glucuronides;Humans;Infant;Male;Minnesota;Mothers;Nicotine;Nitrosamines;Research;Smoke;Statistics,Nonparametric;Tobacco;Tobacco Smoke Pollution;urine;en
dc.description.abstractBiomarkers of carcinogen uptake could provide important information pertinent to the question of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in childhood and cancer development later in life. Previous studies have focused on exposures before birth and during childhood, but carcinogen uptake from ETS in infants has not been reported. Exposures in infants could be higher than in children or adults because of their proximity to parents who smoke. Therefore, we quantified 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL) in the urine of 144 infants, ages 3 to 12 months, who lived in homes with parents who smoked. Total NNAL is an accepted biomarker of uptake of the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone. Cotinine and its glucuronide (total cotinine) and nicotine and its glucuronide (total nicotine) were also quantified. Total NNAL was detectable in 67 of 144 infants (46.5%). Mean levels of total NNAL in the 144 infants were 0.083 +/- 0.200 pmol/mL, whereas those of total cotinine and total nicotine were 0.133 +/- 0.190 and 0.069 +/- 0.102 nmol/mL, respectively. The number of cigarettes smoked per week in the home or car by any family member when the infant was present was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) when NNAL was detected than when it was not (76.0 +/- 88.1 versus 27.1 +/- 38.2). The mean level of NNAL detected in the urine of these infants was higher than in most other field studies of ETS exposure. The results of this study show substantial uptake of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone in infants exposed to ETS and support the concept that persistent ETS exposure in childhood could be related to cancer later in life.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/full/15/5/988en
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquid-
dc.subject.meshCotinine-
dc.subject.meshCreatinine-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGlucuronides-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMothers-
dc.subject.meshNicotine-
dc.subject.meshNitrosamines-
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametric-
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution-
dc.title4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides in the urine of infants exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncologyen

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