A comparison of carotenoids, retinoids, and tocopherols in the serum and buccal mucosa of chronic cigarette smokers versus nonsmokers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/69214
Title:
A comparison of carotenoids, retinoids, and tocopherols in the serum and buccal mucosa of chronic cigarette smokers versus nonsmokers.
Authors:
Gabriel, Helen E.; Liu, Zhenhua; Crott, Jimmy W.; Choi, Sang-Woon; Song, Byeng Chun; Mason, Joel B.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking, a major risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer, is reported to alter oral levels of carotenoids and tocopherols. Such effects may be important because these nutrients, as well as retinoids, are putative chemoprotective agents. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether chronic smoking is associated with altered concentrations of these nutrients in serum and buccal mucosa; to distinguish whether such effects are ascribable to diet; and to determine whether oral concentrations of these nutrients correlate with a putative biomarker of oral cancer risk. METHODS: Serum and buccal mucosal cells (BMC) were analyzed for these nutrients and for BMC micronuclei in smokers (n = 35) and nonsmokers (n = 21). RESULTS: General linear regression with adjustments for dietary intake showed that smokers possess lower serum concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin (P </= 0.01) and a significantly higher serum gamma-tocopherol (P = 0.03). In BMCs, smokers had significantly lower concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, lycopene, and alpha-tocopherol (P < 0.05) but significantly higher gamma-tocopherol (P < 0.01). Among nonsmokers, many serum carotenoid concentrations correlated with concentrations of the corresponding nutrient in BMCs whereas no such correlations existed among smokers. BMC micronuclei did not correlate with the oral concentration of any micronutrient. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic cigarette smokers have lower concentrations of many dietary antioxidants in serum and BMCs compared with nonsmokers, an effect which is not entirely ascribable to diet. Nevertheless, the lack of concordance between oral concentrations of these nutrients and genetic damage in the BMCs of smokers does not support a protective role for these nutrients in oral carcinogenesis.
Citation:
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.2006, 15 (5):993-999
Journal:
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Issue Date:
May-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/69214
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0664
PubMed ID:
16702382
Additional Links:
http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/full/15/5/993
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Biomarker: micronucleiDiet, food or substance: carotenoids, retinoids, and tocopherols. Study type: humans Study design: case-control studyStudy size: 35 smokers and 21 nonsmokers Tissue/biological material/sample size: Buccal Mucosa Cells (BMC); blood. Method of analysis: freshly prepared BMC suspension were smeared on a microscope slide and scored for the presence of micronuclei. Impact on outcome (including dose-response): General linear regression with adjustments for dietary intake showed that smokers possess lower serum concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin (P </= 0.01) and a significantly higher serum gamma-tocopherol (P = 0.03). In BMCs, smokers had significantly lower concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, lycopene, and alpha-tocopherol (P < 0.05) but significantly higher gamma-tocopherol (P < 0.01). Among nonsmokers, many serum carotenoid concentrations correlated with concentrations of the corresponding nutrient in BMCs whereas no such correlations existed among smokers. BMC micronuclei did not correlate with the oral concentration of any micronutrient. KEYWORD CLASSIFICATION: Adult;Aged;Aging;Agriculture;analysis;Biological Markers;biomarkers of dietary exposure;blood;Body Mass Index;Boston;Carotenoids;Chi-Square Distribution;Cross-Sectional Studies;Diet;Female;genetic;Human;Humans;Linear Models;Male;metabolism;Middle Aged;Mouth Mucosa;Research;Retinoids;Smoking;Tocopherols;Washington;
ISSN:
1055-9965
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGabriel, Helen E.-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Zhenhua-
dc.contributor.authorCrott, Jimmy W.-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Sang-Woon-
dc.contributor.authorSong, Byeng Chun-
dc.contributor.authorMason, Joel B.-
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Elizabeth J.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-28T09:34:54Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-28T09:34:54Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-
dc.identifier.citationCancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.2006, 15 (5):993-999en
dc.identifier.issn1055-9965-
dc.identifier.pmid16702382-
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0664-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/69214-
dc.descriptionBiomarker: micronucleiDiet, food or substance: carotenoids, retinoids, and tocopherols. Study type: humans Study design: case-control studyStudy size: 35 smokers and 21 nonsmokers Tissue/biological material/sample size: Buccal Mucosa Cells (BMC); blood. Method of analysis: freshly prepared BMC suspension were smeared on a microscope slide and scored for the presence of micronuclei. Impact on outcome (including dose-response): General linear regression with adjustments for dietary intake showed that smokers possess lower serum concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin (P </= 0.01) and a significantly higher serum gamma-tocopherol (P = 0.03). In BMCs, smokers had significantly lower concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, lycopene, and alpha-tocopherol (P < 0.05) but significantly higher gamma-tocopherol (P < 0.01). Among nonsmokers, many serum carotenoid concentrations correlated with concentrations of the corresponding nutrient in BMCs whereas no such correlations existed among smokers. BMC micronuclei did not correlate with the oral concentration of any micronutrient. KEYWORD CLASSIFICATION: Adult;Aged;Aging;Agriculture;analysis;Biological Markers;biomarkers of dietary exposure;blood;Body Mass Index;Boston;Carotenoids;Chi-Square Distribution;Cross-Sectional Studies;Diet;Female;genetic;Human;Humans;Linear Models;Male;metabolism;Middle Aged;Mouth Mucosa;Research;Retinoids;Smoking;Tocopherols;Washington;en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking, a major risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer, is reported to alter oral levels of carotenoids and tocopherols. Such effects may be important because these nutrients, as well as retinoids, are putative chemoprotective agents. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether chronic smoking is associated with altered concentrations of these nutrients in serum and buccal mucosa; to distinguish whether such effects are ascribable to diet; and to determine whether oral concentrations of these nutrients correlate with a putative biomarker of oral cancer risk. METHODS: Serum and buccal mucosal cells (BMC) were analyzed for these nutrients and for BMC micronuclei in smokers (n = 35) and nonsmokers (n = 21). RESULTS: General linear regression with adjustments for dietary intake showed that smokers possess lower serum concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin (P </= 0.01) and a significantly higher serum gamma-tocopherol (P = 0.03). In BMCs, smokers had significantly lower concentrations of beta- and alpha-carotene, lycopene, and alpha-tocopherol (P < 0.05) but significantly higher gamma-tocopherol (P < 0.01). Among nonsmokers, many serum carotenoid concentrations correlated with concentrations of the corresponding nutrient in BMCs whereas no such correlations existed among smokers. BMC micronuclei did not correlate with the oral concentration of any micronutrient. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic cigarette smokers have lower concentrations of many dietary antioxidants in serum and BMCs compared with nonsmokers, an effect which is not entirely ascribable to diet. Nevertheless, the lack of concordance between oral concentrations of these nutrients and genetic damage in the BMCs of smokers does not support a protective role for these nutrients in oral carcinogenesis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/full/15/5/993en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshCarotenoids-
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLinear Models-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa-
dc.subject.meshRetinoids-
dc.subject.meshSmoking-
dc.subject.meshTocopherols-
dc.titleA comparison of carotenoids, retinoids, and tocopherols in the serum and buccal mucosa of chronic cigarette smokers versus nonsmokers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncologyen
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