Cancer survivorship--genetic susceptibility and second primary cancers: research strategies and recommendations.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/68855
Title:
Cancer survivorship--genetic susceptibility and second primary cancers: research strategies and recommendations.
Authors:
Travis, Lois B.; Rabkin, Charles S.; Brown, Linda Morris; Allan, James M.; Alter, Blanche P.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Begg, Colin B.; Caporaso, Neil; Chanock, Stephen; DeMichele, Angela; Figg, William Douglas; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Hall, Eric J.; Hisada, Michie; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Little, John B.; Malkin, David; Ng, Andrea K.; Offit, Kenneth; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Shields, Peter G.; Strong, Louise; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Tucker, Margaret A.; Greene, Mark H.
Abstract:
Cancer survivors constitute 3.5% of the United States population, but second primary malignancies among this high-risk group now account for 16% of all cancer incidence. Although few data currently exist regarding the molecular mechanisms for second primary cancers and other late outcomes after cancer treatment, the careful measurement and documentation of potentially carcinogenic treatments (chemotherapy and radiotherapy) provide a unique platform for in vivo research on gene-environment interactions in human carcinogenesis. We review research priorities identified during a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored workshop entitled "Cancer Survivorship--Genetic Susceptibility and Second Primary Cancers." These priorities include 1) development of a national research infrastructure for studies of cancer survivorship; 2) creation of a coordinated system for biospecimen collection; 3) development of new technology, bioinformatics, and biomarkers; 4) design of new epidemiologic methods; and 5) development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Many of the infrastructure resources and design strategies that would facilitate research in this area also provide a foundation for the study of other important nonneoplastic late effects of treatment and psychosocial concerns among cancer survivors. These research areas warrant high priority to promote NCI's goal of eliminating pain and suffering related to cancer.
Citation:
J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 2006, 98 (1):15-25
Journal:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Issue Date:
4-Jan-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/68855
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/djj001
PubMed ID:
16391368
Additional Links:
http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/98/1/15
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Antineoplastic Agents;biomarkers of individual susceptibility: validation;Biotechnology;cancer epidemiology;chemically induced;Carcinogens;Case-Control Studies;Clinical Trials;Cohort Studies;Congresses;drug therapy;epidemiology;etiology;genetics;Genetic Predisposition to Disease;Humans;methods;mortality;Medical Informatics;Multicenter Studies;Neoplasms;Neoplasms,Radiation-Induced;Neoplasms,Second Primary;radiotherapy;Radiotherapy;Registries;Research;statistics & numerical data;Specimen Handling;Survivors;Syndrome;United States.
ISSN:
1460-2105
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTravis, Lois B.-
dc.contributor.authorRabkin, Charles S.-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Linda Morris-
dc.contributor.authorAllan, James M.-
dc.contributor.authorAlter, Blanche P.-
dc.contributor.authorAmbrosone, Christine B.-
dc.contributor.authorBegg, Colin B.-
dc.contributor.authorCaporaso, Neil-
dc.contributor.authorChanock, Stephen-
dc.contributor.authorDeMichele, Angela-
dc.contributor.authorFigg, William Douglas-
dc.contributor.authorGospodarowicz, Mary K.-
dc.contributor.authorHall, Eric J.-
dc.contributor.authorHisada, Michie-
dc.contributor.authorInskip, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorKleinerman, Ruth-
dc.contributor.authorLittle, John B.-
dc.contributor.authorMalkin, David-
dc.contributor.authorNg, Andrea K.-
dc.contributor.authorOffit, Kenneth-
dc.contributor.authorPui, Ching-Hon-
dc.contributor.authorRobison, Leslie L.-
dc.contributor.authorRothman, Nathaniel-
dc.contributor.authorShields, Peter G.-
dc.contributor.authorStrong, Louise-
dc.contributor.authorTaniguchi, Toshiyasu-
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Margaret A.-
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Mark H.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-25T07:56:36Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-25T07:56:36Z-
dc.date.issued2006-01-04-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Natl. Cancer Inst. 2006, 98 (1):15-25en
dc.identifier.issn1460-2105-
dc.identifier.pmid16391368-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jnci/djj001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/68855-
dc.descriptionKEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Antineoplastic Agents;biomarkers of individual susceptibility: validation;Biotechnology;cancer epidemiology;chemically induced;Carcinogens;Case-Control Studies;Clinical Trials;Cohort Studies;Congresses;drug therapy;epidemiology;etiology;genetics;Genetic Predisposition to Disease;Humans;methods;mortality;Medical Informatics;Multicenter Studies;Neoplasms;Neoplasms,Radiation-Induced;Neoplasms,Second Primary;radiotherapy;Radiotherapy;Registries;Research;statistics & numerical data;Specimen Handling;Survivors;Syndrome;United States.en
dc.description.abstractCancer survivors constitute 3.5% of the United States population, but second primary malignancies among this high-risk group now account for 16% of all cancer incidence. Although few data currently exist regarding the molecular mechanisms for second primary cancers and other late outcomes after cancer treatment, the careful measurement and documentation of potentially carcinogenic treatments (chemotherapy and radiotherapy) provide a unique platform for in vivo research on gene-environment interactions in human carcinogenesis. We review research priorities identified during a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored workshop entitled "Cancer Survivorship--Genetic Susceptibility and Second Primary Cancers." These priorities include 1) development of a national research infrastructure for studies of cancer survivorship; 2) creation of a coordinated system for biospecimen collection; 3) development of new technology, bioinformatics, and biomarkers; 4) design of new epidemiologic methods; and 5) development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Many of the infrastructure resources and design strategies that would facilitate research in this area also provide a foundation for the study of other important nonneoplastic late effects of treatment and psychosocial concerns among cancer survivors. These research areas warrant high priority to promote NCI's goal of eliminating pain and suffering related to cancer.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/98/1/15en
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshBiotechnology-
dc.subject.meshCarcinogens-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshCongresses as Topic-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Disease-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMedical Informatics-
dc.subject.meshMulticenter Studies as Topic-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Second Primary-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy-
dc.subject.meshRegistries-
dc.subject.meshSpecimen Handling-
dc.subject.meshSurvivors-
dc.subject.meshSyndrome-
dc.subject.meshUnited States-
dc.titleCancer survivorship--genetic susceptibility and second primary cancers: research strategies and recommendations.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the National Cancer Instituteen

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