2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/68514
Title:
Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.
Authors:
Lynn, Anthony; Collins, Andrew; Fuller, Zoë; Hillman, Kevin; Ratcliffe, Brian
Abstract:
Cruciferous vegetables have been studied extensively for their chemoprotective effects. Although they contain many bioactive compounds, the anti-carcinogenic actions of cruciferous vegetables are commonly attributed to their content of glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are relatively biologically inert but can be hydrolysed to a range of bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates (ITC) and indoles by the plant-based enzyme myrosinase, or less efficiently by the colonic microflora. A number of mechanisms whereby ITC and indoles may protect against colo-rectal cancer have been identified. In experimental animals cruciferous vegetables have been shown to inhibit chemically-induced colon cancer. However, the results of recent epidemiological cohort studies have been inconsistent and this disparity may reflect a lack of sensitivity of such studies. Possible explanations for the failure of epidemiological studies to detect an effect include: assessment of cruciferous vegetable intake by methods that are subject to large measurement errors; the interaction between diet and genotype has not been considered: the effect that post-harvest treatments may have on biological effects of cruciferous vegetables has not been taken into account.
Citation:
Proc Nutr Soc 2006, 65 (1):135-144
Journal:
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Issue Date:
Feb-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/68514
PubMed ID:
16441953
Additional Links:
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=814716
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Apoptosis;Brassicaceae;chemically induced;chemistry;Cell Division;Colorectal Neoplasms;drug effects;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Evaluation;Food Handling;Glucosinolates;Glycoside Hydrolases;Humans;Hydrolases;Isothiocyanates;metabolism;methods;pharmacology;prevention & control;Research.
ISSN:
0029-6651
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLynn, Anthony-
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Zoë-
dc.contributor.authorHillman, Kevin-
dc.contributor.authorRatcliffe, Brian-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-19T08:23:21Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-19T08:23:21Z-
dc.date.issued2006-02-
dc.identifier.citationProc Nutr Soc 2006, 65 (1):135-144en
dc.identifier.issn0029-6651-
dc.identifier.pmid16441953-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/68514-
dc.descriptionKEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Apoptosis;Brassicaceae;chemically induced;chemistry;Cell Division;Colorectal Neoplasms;drug effects;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Evaluation;Food Handling;Glucosinolates;Glycoside Hydrolases;Humans;Hydrolases;Isothiocyanates;metabolism;methods;pharmacology;prevention & control;Research.en
dc.description.abstractCruciferous vegetables have been studied extensively for their chemoprotective effects. Although they contain many bioactive compounds, the anti-carcinogenic actions of cruciferous vegetables are commonly attributed to their content of glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are relatively biologically inert but can be hydrolysed to a range of bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates (ITC) and indoles by the plant-based enzyme myrosinase, or less efficiently by the colonic microflora. A number of mechanisms whereby ITC and indoles may protect against colo-rectal cancer have been identified. In experimental animals cruciferous vegetables have been shown to inhibit chemically-induced colon cancer. However, the results of recent epidemiological cohort studies have been inconsistent and this disparity may reflect a lack of sensitivity of such studies. Possible explanations for the failure of epidemiological studies to detect an effect include: assessment of cruciferous vegetable intake by methods that are subject to large measurement errors; the interaction between diet and genotype has not been considered: the effect that post-harvest treatments may have on biological effects of cruciferous vegetables has not been taken into account.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=814716en
dc.subjectCruciferous vegetablesen
dc.subjectBroccolien
dc.subjectColo-rectal canceren
dc.subject.meshAnticarcinogenic Agents-
dc.subject.meshApoptosis-
dc.subject.meshBrassicaceae-
dc.subject.meshCell Division-
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshFood Handling-
dc.subject.meshGlucosinolates-
dc.subject.meshGlycoside Hydrolases-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIsothiocyanates-
dc.titleCruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen

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