A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/67735
Title:
A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer.
Authors:
Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Hunter, David J.; Spiegelman, Donna; Anderson, Kristin E.; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Buring, Julie E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Fraser, Gary E.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; Hankinson, Susan E.; Koenig, Karen L.; Larsson, Susanna C.; Leitzmann, Michael; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Miller, Anthony B.; Rodriguez, Carmen; Rohan, Thomas E.; Ross, Julie A.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Schouten, Leo J.; Smit, Ellen; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Shumin M.; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.
Abstract:
Fat and cholesterol are theorized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by increasing circulating estrogen levels. Although case-control studies have reported positive associations between total and saturated fat intake and ovarian cancer risk, two cohort studies have observed null associations. Dietary cholesterol and eggs have been positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. A pooled analysis was conducted on 12 cohort studies. Among 523,217 women, 2,132 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Total fat intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.86-1.34 comparing > or =45 to 30-<35% of calories). No association was observed for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes with ovarian cancer risk. A weakly positive, but non-linear association, was observed for saturated fat intake (pooled multivariate RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01-1.66 comparing highest versus lowest decile). Results for histologic subtypes were similar. Overall, fat, cholesterol and egg intakes were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. The positive association for saturated fat intake at very high intakes merits further investigation.
Citation:
Cancer Causes Control 2006, 17 (3):273-285
Journal:
Cancer causes & control : CCC
Issue Date:
Apr-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/67735
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-005-0455-7
PubMed ID:
16489535
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/q7n7610303545557/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;analysis;Boston;cancer epidemiology;Cholesterol;Cohort Studies;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Dietary Fats;epidemiology;etiology;Eggs;Female;Food Habits;Humans;North America;Ovarian Neoplasms;Public Health;Research;Risk.
ISSN:
0957-5243
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGenkinger, Jeanine M.-
dc.contributor.authorHunter, David J.-
dc.contributor.authorSpiegelman, Donna-
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Kristin E.-
dc.contributor.authorBeeson, W. Lawrence-
dc.contributor.authorBuring, Julie E.-
dc.contributor.authorColditz, Graham A.-
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Gary E.-
dc.contributor.authorFreudenheim, Jo L.-
dc.contributor.authorGoldbohm, R. Alexandra-
dc.contributor.authorHankinson, Susan E.-
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Karen L.-
dc.contributor.authorLarsson, Susanna C.-
dc.contributor.authorLeitzmann, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorMcCullough, Marjorie L.-
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Anthony B.-
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Carmen-
dc.contributor.authorRohan, Thomas E.-
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Julie A.-
dc.contributor.authorSchatzkin, Arthur-
dc.contributor.authorSchouten, Leo J.-
dc.contributor.authorSmit, Ellen-
dc.contributor.authorWillett, Walter C.-
dc.contributor.authorWolk, Alicja-
dc.contributor.authorZeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Shumin M.-
dc.contributor.authorSmith-Warner, Stephanie A.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-11T08:41:11Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-11T08:41:11Z-
dc.date.issued2006-04-
dc.identifier.citationCancer Causes Control 2006, 17 (3):273-285en
dc.identifier.issn0957-5243-
dc.identifier.pmid16489535-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10552-005-0455-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/67735-
dc.descriptionKEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;analysis;Boston;cancer epidemiology;Cholesterol;Cohort Studies;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Dietary Fats;epidemiology;etiology;Eggs;Female;Food Habits;Humans;North America;Ovarian Neoplasms;Public Health;Research;Risk.en
dc.description.abstractFat and cholesterol are theorized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by increasing circulating estrogen levels. Although case-control studies have reported positive associations between total and saturated fat intake and ovarian cancer risk, two cohort studies have observed null associations. Dietary cholesterol and eggs have been positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. A pooled analysis was conducted on 12 cohort studies. Among 523,217 women, 2,132 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Total fat intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.86-1.34 comparing > or =45 to 30-<35% of calories). No association was observed for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes with ovarian cancer risk. A weakly positive, but non-linear association, was observed for saturated fat intake (pooled multivariate RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01-1.66 comparing highest versus lowest decile). Results for histologic subtypes were similar. Overall, fat, cholesterol and egg intakes were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. The positive association for saturated fat intake at very high intakes merits further investigation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/q7n7610303545557/en
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectFaten
dc.subjectCholesterolen
dc.subjectEggen
dc.subjectOvarian canceren
dc.subject.meshCholesterol-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshDietary Fats-
dc.subject.meshEggs-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFood Habits-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNorth America-
dc.subject.meshOvarian Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshRisk-
dc.titleA pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCancer causes & control : CCCen

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