2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/65113
Title:
The effect of lifestyle factors on gynaecological cancer.
Authors:
Rieck, Gudrun; Fiander, Alison
Abstract:
Several lifestyle factors affect a woman's risk of gynaecological cancer and-potentially-can be modified to reduce risk. This chapter summarises the evidence for the effect of lifestyle factors on the incidence of gynaecological malignancy. The incidence of obesity is increasing in the developed world such that it now contributes as much as smoking to overall cancer deaths. Women with a body mass index (BMI)>40 have a 60% higher risk of dying from all cancers than women of normal weight. They are also at increased risk from gynaecological cancer. Dietary factors significantly influence the risk of gynaecological cancer: fruit, vegetables and antioxidants reduce risk whereas high animal fat and energy intakes increase risk. Alcohol intake adversely affects breast cancer risk, possibly accounting for 4% of all breast cancers. Physical activity protects against ovarian, endometrial and postmenopausal breast cancer, independently of BMI. The oral contraceptive pill has a substantial and long-lasting effect on the prevention of ovarian and endometrial cancer and is one of the best examples of large-scale chemoprevention in the developed world. Childbearing is protective against ovarian, endometrial and breast cancer but increases the risk of cervical cancer. Smoking acts as a cofactor in cervical carcinogenesis and increases the risk of ovarian cancer, particularly mucinous tumours.
Citation:
Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol 2006, 20 (2):227-251
Journal:
Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology
Issue Date:
Apr-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/65113
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2005.10.010
PubMed ID:
16543119
Additional Links:
http://www.bestpracticeobgyn.com/article/S1521-6934(05)00145-8/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Alcohol Drinking;complications;Contraceptives,Oral,Hormonal;Diet;etiology;Estrogen Replacement Therapy;Evaluation;Exercise;Female;Genital Neoplasms,Female;Humans;Life Style;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Obesity;prevention & control;Papillomaviridae;Papillomavirus Infections;Reproductive History;Risk Factors;Smoking;Wales.
ISSN:
1521-6934
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRieck, Gudrun-
dc.contributor.authorFiander, Alison-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-16T12:15:40Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-16T12:15:40Z-
dc.date.issued2006-04-
dc.identifier.citationBest Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol 2006, 20 (2):227-251en
dc.identifier.issn1521-6934-
dc.identifier.pmid16543119-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2005.10.010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/65113-
dc.descriptionKEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Alcohol Drinking;complications;Contraceptives,Oral,Hormonal;Diet;etiology;Estrogen Replacement Therapy;Evaluation;Exercise;Female;Genital Neoplasms,Female;Humans;Life Style;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Obesity;prevention & control;Papillomaviridae;Papillomavirus Infections;Reproductive History;Risk Factors;Smoking;Wales.en
dc.description.abstractSeveral lifestyle factors affect a woman's risk of gynaecological cancer and-potentially-can be modified to reduce risk. This chapter summarises the evidence for the effect of lifestyle factors on the incidence of gynaecological malignancy. The incidence of obesity is increasing in the developed world such that it now contributes as much as smoking to overall cancer deaths. Women with a body mass index (BMI)>40 have a 60% higher risk of dying from all cancers than women of normal weight. They are also at increased risk from gynaecological cancer. Dietary factors significantly influence the risk of gynaecological cancer: fruit, vegetables and antioxidants reduce risk whereas high animal fat and energy intakes increase risk. Alcohol intake adversely affects breast cancer risk, possibly accounting for 4% of all breast cancers. Physical activity protects against ovarian, endometrial and postmenopausal breast cancer, independently of BMI. The oral contraceptive pill has a substantial and long-lasting effect on the prevention of ovarian and endometrial cancer and is one of the best examples of large-scale chemoprevention in the developed world. Childbearing is protective against ovarian, endometrial and breast cancer but increases the risk of cervical cancer. Smoking acts as a cofactor in cervical carcinogenesis and increases the risk of ovarian cancer, particularly mucinous tumours.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bestpracticeobgyn.com/article/S1521-6934(05)00145-8/abstracten
dc.subjectChemopreventionen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectHormonesen
dc.subjectHuman papillomavirus infectionen
dc.subjectLifestyle factorsen
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectPreventionen
dc.subjectRisk factorsen
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking-
dc.subject.meshContraceptives, Oral, Hormonal-
dc.subject.meshDiet-
dc.subject.meshEstrogen Replacement Therapy-
dc.subject.meshExercise-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGenital Neoplasms, Female-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLife Style-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae-
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections-
dc.subject.meshReproductive History-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSmoking-
dc.titleThe effect of lifestyle factors on gynaecological cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBest practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecologyen

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