Balkan endemic nephropathy: role of ochratoxins A through biomarkers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/57813
Title:
Balkan endemic nephropathy: role of ochratoxins A through biomarkers.
Authors:
Castegnaro, Marcel; Canadas, Delphine; Vrabcheva, Terry; Petkova-Bocharova, Theodora; Chernozemsky, Ivan N.; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie
Abstract:
Several studies implicated mycotoxins, in endemic kidney disease geographically limited to Balkan region (Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN)). In Bulgaria, much higher prevalence of ochratoxin A (OTA), exceeding 2 microg/L, was observed in the blood of affected population. OTA is found more often in the urine of people living in BEN-endemic villages. To confirm and quantify exposure to OTA in Vratza district, we followed up OTA intake for 1 month, OTA in blood and urine from healthy (20-30 years old) volunteers, from two villages with high risk for BEN disease. Food samples were collected daily, blood and urine at the beginning of each week. Relations between increasing OTA intake, blood concentration and elimination of OTA in urine have been studied in rats. Average weekly intake of OTA varies from 1.9 to 206 ng/kg body weight, twice tolerable weekly intake recommended by JECFA. OTA blood concentrations are in the same range as previously reported in this region with concentrations reaching 10 microg/L. Weekly OTA food intake is not directly correlated with blood and urine concentrations. Biomarkers of biological effects such as DNA adducts were detected in patients affected by urinary tract tumours (UTT) and in rat study. All these plead for the implication of OTA, in BEN and UTT.
Citation:
Mol. Nutr. Food Res. 2006, 50 (6):519-529
Journal:
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
Issue Date:
May-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/57813
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.200500182
PubMed ID:
16715544
Additional Links:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112634611/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Biomarker: DNA adductsExposure/effect represented: ochratoxin A (OTA) / DNA damageStudy type: humans, Dark Agouti ratsStudy design: cross-sectional studyStudy size: 16 healthy volunteersAnalytical technique: OTA food intake, OTA blood concentration and urinary OTA excretion; DNA adducts in kidney of male and female rats using post labellingTissue/biological material/sample size: human blood and urine; Dark Agouti rat blood, urine and kidneyImpact on outcome (including dose-response): Average weekly intake of OTA varies from 1.9 to 206 ng/kg body weight, twice tolerable weekly intake recommended by JECFA. OTA blood concentrations are in the same range as previously reported in this region with concentrations reaching 10 microg/L. Weekly OTA food intake is not directly correlated with blood and urine concentrations. Biomarkers of biological effects such as DNA adducts were detected in patients affected by urinary tract tumours (UTT) and in rat study. KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Adult;analysis;Animals;Balkan Nephropathy;Biological Markers;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;blood;chemically induced;chemistry;Diet;DNA Adducts;Female;field studies;Food;Food Contamination;France;genetics;Humans;Kidney;Male;Ochratoxins;Pedigree;Rats;Research;Sex Characteristics;Triticum;urine;Urologic Neoplasms;
ISSN:
1613-4125
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCastegnaro, Marcel-
dc.contributor.authorCanadas, Delphine-
dc.contributor.authorVrabcheva, Terry-
dc.contributor.authorPetkova-Bocharova, Theodora-
dc.contributor.authorChernozemsky, Ivan N.-
dc.contributor.authorPfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-30T09:10:38Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-30T09:10:38Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-
dc.identifier.citationMol. Nutr. Food Res. 2006, 50 (6):519-529en
dc.identifier.issn1613-4125-
dc.identifier.pmid16715544-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mnfr.200500182-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/57813-
dc.descriptionBiomarker: DNA adductsExposure/effect represented: ochratoxin A (OTA) / DNA damageStudy type: humans, Dark Agouti ratsStudy design: cross-sectional studyStudy size: 16 healthy volunteersAnalytical technique: OTA food intake, OTA blood concentration and urinary OTA excretion; DNA adducts in kidney of male and female rats using post labellingTissue/biological material/sample size: human blood and urine; Dark Agouti rat blood, urine and kidneyImpact on outcome (including dose-response): Average weekly intake of OTA varies from 1.9 to 206 ng/kg body weight, twice tolerable weekly intake recommended by JECFA. OTA blood concentrations are in the same range as previously reported in this region with concentrations reaching 10 microg/L. Weekly OTA food intake is not directly correlated with blood and urine concentrations. Biomarkers of biological effects such as DNA adducts were detected in patients affected by urinary tract tumours (UTT) and in rat study. KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Adult;analysis;Animals;Balkan Nephropathy;Biological Markers;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;blood;chemically induced;chemistry;Diet;DNA Adducts;Female;field studies;Food;Food Contamination;France;genetics;Humans;Kidney;Male;Ochratoxins;Pedigree;Rats;Research;Sex Characteristics;Triticum;urine;Urologic Neoplasms;en
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies implicated mycotoxins, in endemic kidney disease geographically limited to Balkan region (Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN)). In Bulgaria, much higher prevalence of ochratoxin A (OTA), exceeding 2 microg/L, was observed in the blood of affected population. OTA is found more often in the urine of people living in BEN-endemic villages. To confirm and quantify exposure to OTA in Vratza district, we followed up OTA intake for 1 month, OTA in blood and urine from healthy (20-30 years old) volunteers, from two villages with high risk for BEN disease. Food samples were collected daily, blood and urine at the beginning of each week. Relations between increasing OTA intake, blood concentration and elimination of OTA in urine have been studied in rats. Average weekly intake of OTA varies from 1.9 to 206 ng/kg body weight, twice tolerable weekly intake recommended by JECFA. OTA blood concentrations are in the same range as previously reported in this region with concentrations reaching 10 microg/L. Weekly OTA food intake is not directly correlated with blood and urine concentrations. Biomarkers of biological effects such as DNA adducts were detected in patients affected by urinary tract tumours (UTT) and in rat study. All these plead for the implication of OTA, in BEN and UTT.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112634611/abstracten
dc.subjectBalkan endemic nephropathyen
dc.subjectBlooden
dc.subjectFooden
dc.subjectMycotoxinsen
dc.subjectOchratoxin Aen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBalkan Nephropathy-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshDNA Adducts-
dc.subject.meshDiet-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFood Contamination-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshKidney-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshOchratoxins-
dc.subject.meshPedigree-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshTriticum-
dc.subject.meshUrologic Neoplasms-
dc.titleBalkan endemic nephropathy: role of ochratoxins A through biomarkers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Nutrition & Food Researchen

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