Effect of urban traffic, individual habits, and genetic polymorphisms on background urinary 1-hydroxypyrene excretion.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/57059
Title:
Effect of urban traffic, individual habits, and genetic polymorphisms on background urinary 1-hydroxypyrene excretion.
Authors:
Cocco, Pierluigi; Moore, Patrick S.; Ennas, Maria G.; Tocco, Maria G.; Ibba, Antonio; Mattuzzi, Silvia; Meloni, Michele; Monne, Maria; Piras, Giovanna; Collu, Stefania; Satta, Giannina; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Scarpa, Aldo; Flore, Costantino
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Potential sources of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and genetic polymorphisms were investigated in relation to their contribution to interindividual variation in baseline levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) excretion in subjects without occupational exposure to PAHs. METHODS: Urinary excretion of 1-OHP was measured in 114 subjects, including 48 women and 66 men. Questionnaire information was collected on possible environmental and individual sources of PAH exposure. A subset of 70 individuals also was evaluated for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Ex7+295C-->T) in the cytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene, and 61 of these also were evaluated for the glutathione transferase T1 (GSTT1) gene polymorphism. RESULTS: 1-OHP values did not show a significant seasonal variability and were unaffected by age; education; body mass index; smoking status, including passive smoking; or the C-->T base substitution in position 295 of exon 7 of the CYP1A2 gene. After reciprocal adjustment with logistic regression, living in a heavily trafficked urban area (odds ratio, 4.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-24.9), and frequent intake of grilled meat (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-43.5) were significant predictors of background urinary 1-OHP levels of 0.50 microg/g creatinine or greater. Elevated risks also were associated with daily alcohol intake greater than 65 g and the nonnull GSTT1 genotype. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that exposure to urban traffic, dietary habits, and the nonnull GSTT1 genotype may contribute to interindividual variation in background levels of 1-OHP urinary excretion in subjects without occupational exposure to PAHs.
Citation:
Ann Epidemiol 2007, 17 (1):1-8
Journal:
Annals of epidemiology
Issue Date:
Jan-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/57059
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2005.11.001
PubMed ID:
16406813
Additional Links:
http://www.annalsofepidemiology.org/article/S1047-2797(05)00378-9/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Biomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studiesBiomarker (including alleles if genetic): (Ex7C295C/T) in (CYP1A2) gene, GSTT1, GSTM1Effect studied (phenotype/pathology): PAH metabolismMethod of analysis: HPLC, PCRStudy design: case-controlStudy size: 114 (66 men, 48 women)Impact on outcome (including dose-response): 1-OHP urinary excretion did not vary according to the C/T base substitution in position 295 of exon 7 of the CYP1A2 gene (P=0.0004, for CYP 1A2)Men with the null GSTT1 genotype had significantly greater median levels of 1-OHP excretion (P=0.016)Correlation with other biomarkers: 1-OHPLifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkersLifestyle element evaluated: smoking, alchohol, age, BMI, grilled meatOutcome studied (cancer or cancer biomarker): 1-OHP excretionImpact on outcome: Median 1-OHP excretion did not change by smoking status No effect of ETS exposure in nonsmokers (Mann-Whitney test Z 0.61; p Z 0.54)Neither alcohol consumption nor vehicular traffic showed an association with elevated 1-OHP excretion (Mann-Whitney test: alcohol Z 1.50; p Z 0.13; vehicular traffic Z 0.96; p Z 0.34).1-OHP urinary excretion increased significantly grilled meat (Mann- Whitney testZ3.52; pZ0.0004). KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Adult;Aged;Alcohol Drinking;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;biomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studies;Case-Control Studies;Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2;Diet;education;Environmental Exposure;Female;genetics;Glutathione;Glutathione Transferase;Habits;Humans;Italy;Life Style;Lymphoma;metabolism;Male;Middle Aged;Polymerase Chain Reaction;Polymorphism,Genetic;Pyrenes;Research;Risk Factors;Smoking;urine;Urban Health;Vehicle Emissions.
ISSN:
1047-2797
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCocco, Pierluigi-
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Patrick S.-
dc.contributor.authorEnnas, Maria G.-
dc.contributor.authorTocco, Maria G.-
dc.contributor.authorIbba, Antonio-
dc.contributor.authorMattuzzi, Silvia-
dc.contributor.authorMeloni, Michele-
dc.contributor.authorMonne, Maria-
dc.contributor.authorPiras, Giovanna-
dc.contributor.authorCollu, Stefania-
dc.contributor.authorSatta, Giannina-
dc.contributor.authorZucca, Mariagrazia-
dc.contributor.authorScarpa, Aldo-
dc.contributor.authorFlore, Costantino-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-25T10:24:29Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-25T10:24:29Z-
dc.date.issued2007-01-
dc.identifier.citationAnn Epidemiol 2007, 17 (1):1-8en
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797-
dc.identifier.pmid16406813-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.annepidem.2005.11.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/57059-
dc.descriptionBiomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studiesBiomarker (including alleles if genetic): (Ex7C295C/T) in (CYP1A2) gene, GSTT1, GSTM1Effect studied (phenotype/pathology): PAH metabolismMethod of analysis: HPLC, PCRStudy design: case-controlStudy size: 114 (66 men, 48 women)Impact on outcome (including dose-response): 1-OHP urinary excretion did not vary according to the C/T base substitution in position 295 of exon 7 of the CYP1A2 gene (P=0.0004, for CYP 1A2)Men with the null GSTT1 genotype had significantly greater median levels of 1-OHP excretion (P=0.016)Correlation with other biomarkers: 1-OHPLifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkersLifestyle element evaluated: smoking, alchohol, age, BMI, grilled meatOutcome studied (cancer or cancer biomarker): 1-OHP excretionImpact on outcome: Median 1-OHP excretion did not change by smoking status No effect of ETS exposure in nonsmokers (Mann-Whitney test Z 0.61; p Z 0.54)Neither alcohol consumption nor vehicular traffic showed an association with elevated 1-OHP excretion (Mann-Whitney test: alcohol Z 1.50; p Z 0.13; vehicular traffic Z 0.96; p Z 0.34).1-OHP urinary excretion increased significantly grilled meat (Mann- Whitney testZ3.52; pZ0.0004). KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Adult;Aged;Alcohol Drinking;biomarkers of exposure & effect: field studies;biomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studies;Case-Control Studies;Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2;Diet;education;Environmental Exposure;Female;genetics;Glutathione;Glutathione Transferase;Habits;Humans;Italy;Life Style;Lymphoma;metabolism;Male;Middle Aged;Polymerase Chain Reaction;Polymorphism,Genetic;Pyrenes;Research;Risk Factors;Smoking;urine;Urban Health;Vehicle Emissions.en
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Potential sources of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and genetic polymorphisms were investigated in relation to their contribution to interindividual variation in baseline levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) excretion in subjects without occupational exposure to PAHs. METHODS: Urinary excretion of 1-OHP was measured in 114 subjects, including 48 women and 66 men. Questionnaire information was collected on possible environmental and individual sources of PAH exposure. A subset of 70 individuals also was evaluated for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Ex7+295C-->T) in the cytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene, and 61 of these also were evaluated for the glutathione transferase T1 (GSTT1) gene polymorphism. RESULTS: 1-OHP values did not show a significant seasonal variability and were unaffected by age; education; body mass index; smoking status, including passive smoking; or the C-->T base substitution in position 295 of exon 7 of the CYP1A2 gene. After reciprocal adjustment with logistic regression, living in a heavily trafficked urban area (odds ratio, 4.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-24.9), and frequent intake of grilled meat (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-43.5) were significant predictors of background urinary 1-OHP levels of 0.50 microg/g creatinine or greater. Elevated risks also were associated with daily alcohol intake greater than 65 g and the nonnull GSTT1 genotype. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that exposure to urban traffic, dietary habits, and the nonnull GSTT1 genotype may contribute to interindividual variation in background levels of 1-OHP urinary excretion in subjects without occupational exposure to PAHs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.annalsofepidemiology.org/article/S1047-2797(05)00378-9/abstracten
dc.subject1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP)en
dc.subjectPolycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)en
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectUrban Environmenten
dc.subjectCytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2)en
dc.subjectGlutathione Transferase T1 (GSTT1)en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshCytochrome P-450 CYP1A2-
dc.subject.meshDiet-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGlutathione Transferase-
dc.subject.meshHabits-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshItaly-
dc.subject.meshLife Style-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction-
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic-
dc.subject.meshPyrenes-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSmoking-
dc.subject.meshUrban Health-
dc.subject.meshVehicle Emissions-
dc.titleEffect of urban traffic, individual habits, and genetic polymorphisms on background urinary 1-hydroxypyrene excretion.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of epidemiologyen

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