Urinary biomarkers of 1,3-butadiene in environmental settings using liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/56959
Title:
Urinary biomarkers of 1,3-butadiene in environmental settings using liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry.
Authors:
Sapkota, Amir; Halden, Rolf U.; Dominici, Francesca; Groopman, John D.; Buckley, Timothy J.
Abstract:
Although, 1,3-butadiene is a known human carcinogen emitted from mobile sources, little is known about traffic-related human exposure to this toxicant. This pilot study was designed to characterize traffic-related environmental exposure to 1,3-butadiene and evaluate its urinary mercapturic acids as biomarkers of exposure in these settings. Personal air samples and multiple urine samples were collected on two separate occasions from three groups of individuals that differed by spatial proximity as well as intensity of traffic: (i) toll collectors, (ii) urban-weekday and (iii) suburban-weekend group. Air samples were analyzed using thermal desorption followed by GC/MS and urine samples were analyzed using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS) for two mercapturic acids of 1,3-butadiene: monohydroxy-3-butenyl mercapturic acid (MHBMA) and 1,2-dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (DHBMA). Exposure differed between groups (p<0.05) with median values of 2.38, 1.62 and 0.88 microg/m(3) for toll collectors, the urban-weekday group and the suburban-weekend group, respectively. A refined ID-LC-MS/MS method enabled detection of MHBMA, previously detected only in occupational settings, with high frequency. MHBMA and DHBMA were detected in 95 and 100% of urine samples at levels (mean+/-S.D.) of 9.7+/-9.5, 6.0+/-4.3 and 6.8+/-2.6 ng/mL for MHBMA and 378+/-196, 258+/-133 and 306+/-242 ng/mL for DHBMA for the three different groups, respectively. Mean biomarker levels were higher among the toll collectors compared to the other two groups, however, the differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This study is the first to evaluate 1,3-butadiene biomarkers for subtle differences in environmental exposures. However, additional research will be required to ascertain whether the lack of statistical association observed here is real or attributable to unexpectedly small differences in exposure between groups (<1 microg/m(3)), non-specificity of the biomarker at low exposure, and/or small sample size.
Citation:
Chem. Biol. Interact. 2006, 160 (1):70-79
Journal:
Chemico-biological interactions
Issue Date:
10-Mar-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/56959
DOI:
10.1016/j.cbi.2005.12.006
PubMed ID:
16423335
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T56-4J2TSRH-2&_user=1843694&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000055040&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1843694&md5=8b7278fc3fbd99b70af0699de77c5fdb
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Biomarkers of exposure & effect:: validationBiomarker: 1- and 2-monohydroxy-3-butenyl mercapturic acid (MHBMA) and 1,2-dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (DHBMA) Exposure/effect represented: 1,3-butadieneStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): pilot studyStudy design (if human): Cross-sectionalMode of exposure (if in vivo) (acute, chronic, root of exposure): working environmentTissue/biological material/sample size: 1ml urine samplesMethod of analysis: LC-MS/MSSensitivity (LOD): 0.4 ng/ml for MHBMA and 3.7 ng/ml for DHBMASpecificity: poled urine samples, random selection in duplicates and analysis separatelyDose-response: DHBMA :(mean±S.D.) for the toll collectors (378±196 ng/mL) were higher than in the suburban-weekend exposure group (306±243 ng/mL) and the urbanweekday exposure (258±133 ng/mL), not statistically significant (p > 0.05).MHBMA levels :(mean±S.D.) for the toll collectors (9.7±9.5 ng/mL) were higher than the suburban-weekend group (6.8±2.6 ng/mL) and the urban-weekday exposure group (6.0±4.3 ng/mL), not statistically significant (p > 0.05). KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Air Pollutants;Air Pollutants,Occupational;biomarkers of exposure & effect: validation;Baltimore;Biological Markers;Butadienes;chemistry;Carcinogens;Chromatography,High Pressure Liquid;diagnostic use;Deuterium;Environmental Health;Environmental Monitoring;Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry;Humans;Indicator Dilution Techniques;methods;Public Health;Research;Spectrometry,Mass,Electrospray Ionization;urine.
ISSN:
0009-2797
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSapkota, Amir-
dc.contributor.authorHalden, Rolf U.-
dc.contributor.authorDominici, Francesca-
dc.contributor.authorGroopman, John D.-
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Timothy J.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-24T09:53:35Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-24T09:53:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006-03-10-
dc.identifier.citationChem. Biol. Interact. 2006, 160 (1):70-79en
dc.identifier.issn0009-2797-
dc.identifier.pmid16423335-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cbi.2005.12.006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/56959-
dc.descriptionBiomarkers of exposure & effect:: validationBiomarker: 1- and 2-monohydroxy-3-butenyl mercapturic acid (MHBMA) and 1,2-dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (DHBMA) Exposure/effect represented: 1,3-butadieneStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): pilot studyStudy design (if human): Cross-sectionalMode of exposure (if in vivo) (acute, chronic, root of exposure): working environmentTissue/biological material/sample size: 1ml urine samplesMethod of analysis: LC-MS/MSSensitivity (LOD): 0.4 ng/ml for MHBMA and 3.7 ng/ml for DHBMASpecificity: poled urine samples, random selection in duplicates and analysis separatelyDose-response: DHBMA :(mean±S.D.) for the toll collectors (378±196 ng/mL) were higher than in the suburban-weekend exposure group (306±243 ng/mL) and the urbanweekday exposure (258±133 ng/mL), not statistically significant (p > 0.05).MHBMA levels :(mean±S.D.) for the toll collectors (9.7±9.5 ng/mL) were higher than the suburban-weekend group (6.8±2.6 ng/mL) and the urban-weekday exposure group (6.0±4.3 ng/mL), not statistically significant (p > 0.05). KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Air Pollutants;Air Pollutants,Occupational;biomarkers of exposure & effect: validation;Baltimore;Biological Markers;Butadienes;chemistry;Carcinogens;Chromatography,High Pressure Liquid;diagnostic use;Deuterium;Environmental Health;Environmental Monitoring;Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry;Humans;Indicator Dilution Techniques;methods;Public Health;Research;Spectrometry,Mass,Electrospray Ionization;urine.en
dc.description.abstractAlthough, 1,3-butadiene is a known human carcinogen emitted from mobile sources, little is known about traffic-related human exposure to this toxicant. This pilot study was designed to characterize traffic-related environmental exposure to 1,3-butadiene and evaluate its urinary mercapturic acids as biomarkers of exposure in these settings. Personal air samples and multiple urine samples were collected on two separate occasions from three groups of individuals that differed by spatial proximity as well as intensity of traffic: (i) toll collectors, (ii) urban-weekday and (iii) suburban-weekend group. Air samples were analyzed using thermal desorption followed by GC/MS and urine samples were analyzed using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS) for two mercapturic acids of 1,3-butadiene: monohydroxy-3-butenyl mercapturic acid (MHBMA) and 1,2-dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (DHBMA). Exposure differed between groups (p<0.05) with median values of 2.38, 1.62 and 0.88 microg/m(3) for toll collectors, the urban-weekday group and the suburban-weekend group, respectively. A refined ID-LC-MS/MS method enabled detection of MHBMA, previously detected only in occupational settings, with high frequency. MHBMA and DHBMA were detected in 95 and 100% of urine samples at levels (mean+/-S.D.) of 9.7+/-9.5, 6.0+/-4.3 and 6.8+/-2.6 ng/mL for MHBMA and 378+/-196, 258+/-133 and 306+/-242 ng/mL for DHBMA for the three different groups, respectively. Mean biomarker levels were higher among the toll collectors compared to the other two groups, however, the differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This study is the first to evaluate 1,3-butadiene biomarkers for subtle differences in environmental exposures. However, additional research will be required to ascertain whether the lack of statistical association observed here is real or attributable to unexpectedly small differences in exposure between groups (<1 microg/m(3)), non-specificity of the biomarker at low exposure, and/or small sample size.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T56-4J2TSRH-2&_user=1843694&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000055040&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1843694&md5=8b7278fc3fbd99b70af0699de77c5fdben
dc.subject1,3-Butadieneen
dc.subjectVOCen
dc.subjectExposureen
dc.subjectBiomarkeren
dc.subjectAutomobile exhausten
dc.subjectTrafficen
dc.subjectLC-MS/MSen
dc.subjectTandem mass spectrometryen
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants, Occupational-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshButadienes-
dc.subject.meshCarcinogens-
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquid-
dc.subject.meshDeuterium-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring-
dc.subject.meshGas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIndicator Dilution Techniques-
dc.subject.meshSpectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization-
dc.titleUrinary biomarkers of 1,3-butadiene in environmental settings using liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChemico-biological interactionsen
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