Anthocyanin-rich extracts inhibit multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in rats.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/56855
Title:
Anthocyanin-rich extracts inhibit multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in rats.
Authors:
Lala, Geeta; Malik, Minnie; Zhao, Cuiwei; He, Jian; Kwon, Youngjoo; Giusti, M. Monica; Magnuson, Bernadene A.
Abstract:
The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemoprotective activity of anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa E.), and grape (Vitis vinifera) by assessing multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in male rats treated with a colon carcinogen, azoxymethane. Fischer 344 male rats were fed the AIN-93 diet (control) or AIN-93 diet supplemented with AREs for 14 wk. Biomarkers that were evaluated included the number and multiplicity of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF), colonic cell proliferation, urinary levels of oxidative DNA damage, and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) genes. To assess the bioavailability, levels of anthocyanins in serum, urine, and feces were evaluated. Total ACF were reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry, chokeberry, and grape diet groups compared with the control group. The number of large ACF was also reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry and chokeberry ARE-fed rats. Colonic cellular proliferation was decreased in rats fed bilberry ARE and chokeberry ARE diets. Rats fed bilberry and grape ARE diets had lower COX-2 mRNA expression of gene. High levels of fecal anthocyanins and increased fecal mass and fecal moisture occurred in ARE-fed rats. There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in fecal bile acids in ARE-fed rats. The levels of urinary 8-hydroxyguanosine were similar among rats fed different diets. These results support our previous in vitro studies suggesting a protective role of AREs in colon carcinogenesis and indicate multiple mechanisms of action.
Citation:
Nutr. Cancer 2006, 54 (1):84-93
Journal:
Nutrition and Cancer
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/56855
DOI:
10.1207/s15327914nc5401_10
PubMed ID:
16800776
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a785829855~db=all~order=page
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers; Dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways. Dietary item or component studied: anthocyanin. Outcome studied: colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF); colonic cell proliferation; urinary levels of oxidative DNA damage; expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) genes. Study type: Fischer 344 male rats Tissue/biological material/sample size: colon; serum; urine; fecesMode of exposure: dietary. Impact on outcome (including dose-response): Total ACF were reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry, chokeberry, and grape diet groups compared with the control group. The number of large ACF was also reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry and chokeberry ARE-fed rats. Colonic cellular proliferation was decreased in rats fed bilberry ARE and chokeberry ARE diets. Rats fed bilberry and grape ARE diets had lower COX-2 mRNA expression of gene. High levels of fecal anthocyanins and increased fecal mass and fecal moisture occurred in ARE-fed rats. There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in fecal bile acids in ARE-fed rats. The levels of urinary 8-hydroxyguanosine were similar among rats fed different diets. KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;analogs & derivatives;analysis;Animals;Anthocyanins;Bile;Bile Acids and Salts;Biological Availability;Biological Markers;Body Weight;Cell Division;chemistry;Colon;Colonic Neoplasms;Cyclooxygenase 2;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways;drug effects;Eating;Feces;Food;Fruit;genetics;Guanine;humans;Male;pathology;pharmacokinetics;Phytotherapy;Plant Extracts;prevention & control;Rats;Rats,Inbred F344;Research;RNA,Messenger;Rosaceae;Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms;urine;Vaccinium myrtillus;Vitis;Water;
ISSN:
0163-5581
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLala, Geeta-
dc.contributor.authorMalik, Minnie-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Cuiwei-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Jian-
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Youngjoo-
dc.contributor.authorGiusti, M. Monica-
dc.contributor.authorMagnuson, Bernadene A.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-23T09:39:21Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-23T09:39:21Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationNutr. Cancer 2006, 54 (1):84-93en
dc.identifier.issn0163-5581-
dc.identifier.pmid16800776-
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/s15327914nc5401_10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/56855-
dc.descriptionDietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers; Dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways. Dietary item or component studied: anthocyanin. Outcome studied: colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF); colonic cell proliferation; urinary levels of oxidative DNA damage; expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) genes. Study type: Fischer 344 male rats Tissue/biological material/sample size: colon; serum; urine; fecesMode of exposure: dietary. Impact on outcome (including dose-response): Total ACF were reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry, chokeberry, and grape diet groups compared with the control group. The number of large ACF was also reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry and chokeberry ARE-fed rats. Colonic cellular proliferation was decreased in rats fed bilberry ARE and chokeberry ARE diets. Rats fed bilberry and grape ARE diets had lower COX-2 mRNA expression of gene. High levels of fecal anthocyanins and increased fecal mass and fecal moisture occurred in ARE-fed rats. There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in fecal bile acids in ARE-fed rats. The levels of urinary 8-hydroxyguanosine were similar among rats fed different diets. KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;analogs & derivatives;analysis;Animals;Anthocyanins;Bile;Bile Acids and Salts;Biological Availability;Biological Markers;Body Weight;Cell Division;chemistry;Colon;Colonic Neoplasms;Cyclooxygenase 2;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways;drug effects;Eating;Feces;Food;Fruit;genetics;Guanine;humans;Male;pathology;pharmacokinetics;Phytotherapy;Plant Extracts;prevention & control;Rats;Rats,Inbred F344;Research;RNA,Messenger;Rosaceae;Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms;urine;Vaccinium myrtillus;Vitis;Water;en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to investigate the chemoprotective activity of anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa E.), and grape (Vitis vinifera) by assessing multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in male rats treated with a colon carcinogen, azoxymethane. Fischer 344 male rats were fed the AIN-93 diet (control) or AIN-93 diet supplemented with AREs for 14 wk. Biomarkers that were evaluated included the number and multiplicity of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF), colonic cell proliferation, urinary levels of oxidative DNA damage, and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) genes. To assess the bioavailability, levels of anthocyanins in serum, urine, and feces were evaluated. Total ACF were reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry, chokeberry, and grape diet groups compared with the control group. The number of large ACF was also reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry and chokeberry ARE-fed rats. Colonic cellular proliferation was decreased in rats fed bilberry ARE and chokeberry ARE diets. Rats fed bilberry and grape ARE diets had lower COX-2 mRNA expression of gene. High levels of fecal anthocyanins and increased fecal mass and fecal moisture occurred in ARE-fed rats. There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in fecal bile acids in ARE-fed rats. The levels of urinary 8-hydroxyguanosine were similar among rats fed different diets. These results support our previous in vitro studies suggesting a protective role of AREs in colon carcinogenesis and indicate multiple mechanisms of action.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a785829855~db=all~order=pageen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAnthocyanins-
dc.subject.meshBile Acids and Salts-
dc.subject.meshBiological Availability-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshBody Weight-
dc.subject.meshCell Division-
dc.subject.meshColon-
dc.subject.meshColonic Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCyclooxygenase 2-
dc.subject.meshEating-
dc.subject.meshFeces-
dc.subject.meshFruit-
dc.subject.meshGuanine-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPhytotherapy-
dc.subject.meshPlant Extracts-
dc.subject.meshRNA, Messenger-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshRats, Inbred F344-
dc.subject.meshRosaceae-
dc.subject.meshSpecific Pathogen-Free Organisms-
dc.subject.meshVaccinium myrtillus-
dc.subject.meshVitis-
dc.subject.meshWater-
dc.titleAnthocyanin-rich extracts inhibit multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in rats.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNutrition and Canceren

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