Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/556678
Title:
Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.
Authors:
Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola ( 0000-0001-7569-3882 )
Abstract:
Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.
Affiliation:
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland; Rehabilitation Center “Repty”, Tarnowskie Góry, Poland
Citation:
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2015;28(2):379–387
Journal:
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health
Issue Date:
17-Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/556678
DOI:
10.13075/ijomeh.1896.00514
Additional Links:
http://ijomeh.eu/Bedside-examination-for-vestibular-screening-in-occupational-medicine,1966,0,2.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1896494X
Sponsors:
Nofer Institute Research Project (IMP 18.4/2011)
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewaen
dc.contributor.authorSzostek-Rogula, Sylwiaen
dc.contributor.authorSliwinska-Kowalska, Mariolaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-10T12:05:20Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-10T12:05:20Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-17en
dc.identifier.citationInt J Occup Med Environ Health 2015;28(2):379–387en
dc.identifier.issn1896494Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.13075/ijomeh.1896.00514en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/556678en
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNofer Institute Research Project (IMP 18.4/2011)en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ijomeh.eu/Bedside-examination-for-vestibular-screening-in-occupational-medicine,1966,0,2.htmlen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Healthen
dc.subjectbalanceen
dc.subjectvideonystagmographyen
dc.subjectposturographyen
dc.subjectoccupational medicineen
dc.subjectvertigoen
dc.titleBedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland; Rehabilitation Center “Repty”, Tarnowskie Góry, Polanden
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Healthen
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