2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/55533
Title:
Selenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas.
Authors:
Connelly-Frost, Alexandra; Poole, Charles; Satia, Jessie A.; Kupper, Lawrence L.; Millikan, Robert C.; Sandler, Robert S.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Selenium is an essential trace element found in cereals, wheat, dairy products, meat, and fish. This micronutrient may prevent carcinogenesis through several biochemical pathways; one suggested pathway is enhanced apoptosis. OBJECTIVES: The relation between selenium and colorectal adenomas was evaluated because the colorectal adenoma is the established precursor lesion of most colorectal cancers. Apoptosis was a pathway of interest because decreased apoptosis has been associated with an increased prevalence of adenomas. Our objectives were as follows: to investigate the association between (a) selenium and colorectal adenomas and (b) selenium and apoptosis. METHODS: The study population was assembled for the Diet and Health Study III (n = 803), a cross-sectional study conducted at the University of North Carolina Hospital (Chapel Hill, NC). There were 451 participants in the analysis of selenium and adenoma prevalence and 351 participants in the analysis of selenium and apoptosis. Selenium was measured from serum collected at the time of colonoscopy. Apoptosis was measured in biopsies from normal rectal epithelium obtained during the colonoscopy procedure. RESULTS: Participants in the highest fifth of serum selenium were less likely to have adenomas in comparison with those in the lowest fifth (prevalence ratio, 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.1). Selenium and apoptosis (>2.76 cells per crypt) were not strongly related, but results collectively suggested a roughly inverse association. CONCLUSIONS: High selenium was associated with a reduced prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Apoptosis, however, did not seem to be the mechanism by which selenium was related to adenoma prevalence in our data.
Citation:
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 2006, 15 (3):486-93
Journal:
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention
Issue Date:
Mar-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/55533
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0759
PubMed ID:
16537706
Additional Links:
http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/full/15/3/486
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathwaysDietary item or component studied:seleniumPathways studied:apoptosisStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): humansStudy design (if human):cross-sectional studyStudy size (if human):803 participantsTissue/biological material/sample size: serum, 2 colon biopsiesMode of exposure (if in vivo) (acute, chronic, root of exposure):dietary & lifestyle questionnairesImpact on pathway (including dose-response):for 50-120 μgr/l selenium Pe~0.5-0.3For selenium 120-160 μgr/l Pe~0.4for selenium<160μgr/l Pe~0.3-0.1high selinium intake(>140μgr/l) associated with decreased prevalence of high apoptosis compared to low selenium levels(<140μgr/l)Notes:inverse association between selenium intake and apoptosisDietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers Dietary item or component studied:seleniumOutcome studied (cancer or cancer biomarker):adenocarcinomasStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): humansStudy design (if human):cross-sectional studyStudy size (if human):803 participantsTissue/biological material/sample size:serum, 2 colon biopsiesMode of exposure (if in vivo):dietary & lifestyle questionnaires. KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Adenoma;Adult;Age Distribution;Aged;Aged,80 and over;Apoptosis;blood;Biopsy,Needle;cancer epidemiology;Colorectal Neoplasms;Cross-Sectional Studies;Diet;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways;epidemiology;Female;Humans;Immunohistochemistry;Linear Models;Male;Middle Aged;Neoplasm Staging;North Carolina;pathology;physiology;Prevalence;Probability;Prognosis;Reference Values;Research;Risk Assessment;Selenium;Sensitivity and Specificity;Sex Distribution;Tumor Markers,Biological.
ISSN:
1055-9965
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorConnelly-Frost, Alexandra-
dc.contributor.authorPoole, Charles-
dc.contributor.authorSatia, Jessie A.-
dc.contributor.authorKupper, Lawrence L.-
dc.contributor.authorMillikan, Robert C.-
dc.contributor.authorSandler, Robert S.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-16T09:03:29Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-16T09:03:29Z-
dc.date.issued2006-03-
dc.identifier.citationCancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 2006, 15 (3):486-93en
dc.identifier.issn1055-9965-
dc.identifier.pmid16537706-
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-05-0759-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/55533-
dc.descriptionDietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathwaysDietary item or component studied:seleniumPathways studied:apoptosisStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): humansStudy design (if human):cross-sectional studyStudy size (if human):803 participantsTissue/biological material/sample size: serum, 2 colon biopsiesMode of exposure (if in vivo) (acute, chronic, root of exposure):dietary & lifestyle questionnairesImpact on pathway (including dose-response):for 50-120 μgr/l selenium Pe~0.5-0.3For selenium 120-160 μgr/l Pe~0.4for selenium<160μgr/l Pe~0.3-0.1high selinium intake(>140μgr/l) associated with decreased prevalence of high apoptosis compared to low selenium levels(<140μgr/l)Notes:inverse association between selenium intake and apoptosisDietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers Dietary item or component studied:seleniumOutcome studied (cancer or cancer biomarker):adenocarcinomasStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): humansStudy design (if human):cross-sectional studyStudy size (if human):803 participantsTissue/biological material/sample size:serum, 2 colon biopsiesMode of exposure (if in vivo):dietary & lifestyle questionnaires. KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Adenoma;Adult;Age Distribution;Aged;Aged,80 and over;Apoptosis;blood;Biopsy,Needle;cancer epidemiology;Colorectal Neoplasms;Cross-Sectional Studies;Diet;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways;epidemiology;Female;Humans;Immunohistochemistry;Linear Models;Male;Middle Aged;Neoplasm Staging;North Carolina;pathology;physiology;Prevalence;Probability;Prognosis;Reference Values;Research;Risk Assessment;Selenium;Sensitivity and Specificity;Sex Distribution;Tumor Markers,Biological.en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Selenium is an essential trace element found in cereals, wheat, dairy products, meat, and fish. This micronutrient may prevent carcinogenesis through several biochemical pathways; one suggested pathway is enhanced apoptosis. OBJECTIVES: The relation between selenium and colorectal adenomas was evaluated because the colorectal adenoma is the established precursor lesion of most colorectal cancers. Apoptosis was a pathway of interest because decreased apoptosis has been associated with an increased prevalence of adenomas. Our objectives were as follows: to investigate the association between (a) selenium and colorectal adenomas and (b) selenium and apoptosis. METHODS: The study population was assembled for the Diet and Health Study III (n = 803), a cross-sectional study conducted at the University of North Carolina Hospital (Chapel Hill, NC). There were 451 participants in the analysis of selenium and adenoma prevalence and 351 participants in the analysis of selenium and apoptosis. Selenium was measured from serum collected at the time of colonoscopy. Apoptosis was measured in biopsies from normal rectal epithelium obtained during the colonoscopy procedure. RESULTS: Participants in the highest fifth of serum selenium were less likely to have adenomas in comparison with those in the lowest fifth (prevalence ratio, 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.1). Selenium and apoptosis (>2.76 cells per crypt) were not strongly related, but results collectively suggested a roughly inverse association. CONCLUSIONS: High selenium was associated with a reduced prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Apoptosis, however, did not seem to be the mechanism by which selenium was related to adenoma prevalence in our data.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/full/15/3/486en
dc.subject.meshAdenoma-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAge Distribution-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshApoptosis-
dc.subject.meshBiopsy, Needle-
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry-
dc.subject.meshLinear Models-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshProbability-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshReference Values-
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment-
dc.subject.meshSelenium-
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity-
dc.subject.meshSex Distribution-
dc.subject.meshTumor Markers, Biological-
dc.titleSelenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCancer epidemiology, biomarkers & preventionen

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