Risk factors for lung cancer in Iowa women: implications for prevention.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/52493
Title:
Risk factors for lung cancer in Iowa women: implications for prevention.
Authors:
Neuberger, John S.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Field, R. William
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Multiple risk factors possibly associated with lung cancer were examined as part of a large-scale residential radon case-control study conducted in Iowa between 1994 and 1997. We were particularly interested in stratifying risk factors by smoking status. Relatively little risk factor information is available for Midwestern rural women. METHODS: Four hundred thirteen female lung cancer cases and 614 controls aged 40-84, who were residents of their current home for at least 20 years, were included. Risk factors examined included cigarette smoking, passive smoking, occupation, chemical exposure, previous lung disease, family history of cancer, and urban residence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted after adjusting for age, education, and cumulative radon exposure. RESULTS: As expected, active cigarette smoking was the major risk factor for lung cancer. While cessation of smoking was significantly associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, the risk remained significantly elevated for 25 years. Among all cases, asbestos exposure was a significant risk. Among ex-smokers, pack-year history predominated as the major risk. Among never smokers, a family history of kidney or bladder cancer were significant risk factors (OR=7.34, 95% CI=1.91-28.18; and OR=5.02, 95% CI=1.64-15.39, respectively), as was a history of previous lung disease (OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.24-4.18) and asbestos exposure. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was found for occupation or urban residence. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking prevention activities are urgently needed in rural areas of the United States. Relatives of individuals with smoking-related cancers are potentially at increased risk. Genetic risk factors should be more fully investigated in never smokers.
Citation:
Cancer Detect. Prev. 2006, 30 (2):158-167
Journal:
Cancer detection and prevention
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/52493
DOI:
10.1016/j.cdp.2006.03.001
PubMed ID:
16581199
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6X28-4JMKMPP-1&_user=1843694&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000055040&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1843694&md5=ccdaefac845d38708807c81e4e516682; http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid=16581199
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Cancer epidemiologyCancer type:lung cancerStudy design:large scale case- controlStudy size:413 cases, 614 controlsDescription of cohort(s) studied:Exposure(s) evaluated:sigarette smoking, occupational exposure to arsenic, asbestos, crystalline silica, environmental tobacco smoke, and radon progeny and dietConfounders controlled for:age, family history of cancer, radon and educationImpact on risk: current smokers with OR=14.7, 95% CI=7.44-29.05.Family history of blader, kidney, prostate of lung cancer with OR=3.39, 3.25, 1.88, 1.6 respectivelyNotes:an elevated risk for cigarette smoking, asbestos exposure and family history of bladder & kidney cancer Keywords classification: adverse effects;analysis;Adult;Aged;Aged,80 and over;cancer epidemiology;Carcinogens;Carcinogens,Environmental;Case-Control Studies;education;epidemiology;etiology;Environmental Exposure;Female;history;Humans;Iowa;Logistic Models;Lung Neoplasms;Middle Aged;prevention & control;Public Health;Questionnaires;Radon;Research;Risk;Risk Factors;Rural Population;Smoking;United States;field studies;genetic;Family;
ISSN:
0361-090X
Appears in Collections:
Articles with annotation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNeuberger, John S.-
dc.contributor.authorMahnken, Jonathan D.-
dc.contributor.authorMayo, Matthew S.-
dc.contributor.authorField, R. William-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-06T09:02:45Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-06T09:02:45Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationCancer Detect. Prev. 2006, 30 (2):158-167en
dc.identifier.issn0361-090X-
dc.identifier.pmid16581199-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cdp.2006.03.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/52493-
dc.descriptionCancer epidemiologyCancer type:lung cancerStudy design:large scale case- controlStudy size:413 cases, 614 controlsDescription of cohort(s) studied:Exposure(s) evaluated:sigarette smoking, occupational exposure to arsenic, asbestos, crystalline silica, environmental tobacco smoke, and radon progeny and dietConfounders controlled for:age, family history of cancer, radon and educationImpact on risk: current smokers with OR=14.7, 95% CI=7.44-29.05.Family history of blader, kidney, prostate of lung cancer with OR=3.39, 3.25, 1.88, 1.6 respectivelyNotes:an elevated risk for cigarette smoking, asbestos exposure and family history of bladder & kidney cancer Keywords classification: adverse effects;analysis;Adult;Aged;Aged,80 and over;cancer epidemiology;Carcinogens;Carcinogens,Environmental;Case-Control Studies;education;epidemiology;etiology;Environmental Exposure;Female;history;Humans;Iowa;Logistic Models;Lung Neoplasms;Middle Aged;prevention & control;Public Health;Questionnaires;Radon;Research;Risk;Risk Factors;Rural Population;Smoking;United States;field studies;genetic;Family;en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Multiple risk factors possibly associated with lung cancer were examined as part of a large-scale residential radon case-control study conducted in Iowa between 1994 and 1997. We were particularly interested in stratifying risk factors by smoking status. Relatively little risk factor information is available for Midwestern rural women. METHODS: Four hundred thirteen female lung cancer cases and 614 controls aged 40-84, who were residents of their current home for at least 20 years, were included. Risk factors examined included cigarette smoking, passive smoking, occupation, chemical exposure, previous lung disease, family history of cancer, and urban residence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted after adjusting for age, education, and cumulative radon exposure. RESULTS: As expected, active cigarette smoking was the major risk factor for lung cancer. While cessation of smoking was significantly associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, the risk remained significantly elevated for 25 years. Among all cases, asbestos exposure was a significant risk. Among ex-smokers, pack-year history predominated as the major risk. Among never smokers, a family history of kidney or bladder cancer were significant risk factors (OR=7.34, 95% CI=1.91-28.18; and OR=5.02, 95% CI=1.64-15.39, respectively), as was a history of previous lung disease (OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.24-4.18) and asbestos exposure. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was found for occupation or urban residence. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking prevention activities are urgently needed in rural areas of the United States. Relatives of individuals with smoking-related cancers are potentially at increased risk. Genetic risk factors should be more fully investigated in never smokers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6X28-4JMKMPP-1&_user=1843694&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000055040&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1843694&md5=ccdaefac845d38708807c81e4e516682en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid=16581199en
dc.subjectLung canceren
dc.subjectCase–controlen
dc.subjectRisk factorsen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectFamily historyen
dc.subjectTobaccoen
dc.subjectSmoking preventonen
dc.subjectPassive smokingen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic statusen
dc.subjectResidential radonen
dc.subjectAsbestos exposureen
dc.subjectIowa Women's Health Studyen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshCarcinogens, Environmental-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIowa-
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models-
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshRadon-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshRural Population-
dc.subject.meshSmoking-
dc.titleRisk factors for lung cancer in Iowa women: implications for prevention.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCancer detection and preventionen

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