DNA repair phenotype and dietary antioxidant supplementation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/36532
Title:
DNA repair phenotype and dietary antioxidant supplementation.
Authors:
Guarnieri, Serena; Loft, Steffen; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Risom, Lotte; Poulsen, Henrik E.; Dragsted, Lars O.; Moller, Peter
Abstract:
Phytochemicals may protect cellular DNA by direct antioxidant effect or modulation of the DNA repair activity. We investigated the repair activity towards oxidised DNA in human mononuclear blood cells (MNBC) in two placebo-controlled antioxidant intervention studies as follows: (1) well-nourished subjects who ingested 600 g fruits and vegetables, or tablets containing the equivalent amount of vitamins and minerals, for 24 d; (2) poorly nourished male smokers who ingested 500 mg vitamin C/d as slow- or plain-release formulations together with 182 mg vitamin E/d for 4 weeks. The mean baseline levels of DNA repair incisions were 65.2 (95 % CI 60.4, 70.0) and 86.1 (95 % CI 76.2, 99.9) among the male smokers and well-nourished subjects, respectively. The male smokers also had high baseline levels of oxidised guanines in MNBC. After supplementation, only the male smokers supplemented with slow-release vitamin C tablets had increased DNA repair activity (27 (95 % CI 12, 41) % higher incision activity). These subjects also benefited from the supplementation by reduced levels of oxidised guanines in MNBC. In conclusion, nutritional status, DNA repair activity and DNA damage are linked, and beneficial effects of antioxidants might only be observed among poorly nourished subjects with high levels of oxidised DNA damage and low repair activity.
Citation:
Br. J. Nutr. 2008, 99 (5):1018-1024
Journal:
The British Journal of Nutrition
Issue Date:
May-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/36532
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114507842796
PubMed ID:
17925050
Additional Links:
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1831040
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-1145
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGuarnieri, Serena-
dc.contributor.authorLoft, Steffen-
dc.contributor.authorRiso, Patrizia-
dc.contributor.authorPorrini, Marisa-
dc.contributor.authorRisom, Lotte-
dc.contributor.authorPoulsen, Henrik E.-
dc.contributor.authorDragsted, Lars O.-
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Peter-
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-27T09:43:09Z-
dc.date.available2008-08-27T09:43:09Z-
dc.date.issued2008-05-
dc.identifier.citationBr. J. Nutr. 2008, 99 (5):1018-1024en
dc.identifier.issn0007-1145-
dc.identifier.pmid17925050-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0007114507842796-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/36532-
dc.description.abstractPhytochemicals may protect cellular DNA by direct antioxidant effect or modulation of the DNA repair activity. We investigated the repair activity towards oxidised DNA in human mononuclear blood cells (MNBC) in two placebo-controlled antioxidant intervention studies as follows: (1) well-nourished subjects who ingested 600 g fruits and vegetables, or tablets containing the equivalent amount of vitamins and minerals, for 24 d; (2) poorly nourished male smokers who ingested 500 mg vitamin C/d as slow- or plain-release formulations together with 182 mg vitamin E/d for 4 weeks. The mean baseline levels of DNA repair incisions were 65.2 (95 % CI 60.4, 70.0) and 86.1 (95 % CI 76.2, 99.9) among the male smokers and well-nourished subjects, respectively. The male smokers also had high baseline levels of oxidised guanines in MNBC. After supplementation, only the male smokers supplemented with slow-release vitamin C tablets had increased DNA repair activity (27 (95 % CI 12, 41) % higher incision activity). These subjects also benefited from the supplementation by reduced levels of oxidised guanines in MNBC. In conclusion, nutritional status, DNA repair activity and DNA damage are linked, and beneficial effects of antioxidants might only be observed among poorly nourished subjects with high levels of oxidised DNA damage and low repair activity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1831040en
dc.subjectDNA repairen
dc.subjectOxidatively damaged DNAen
dc.subjectPhytochemicalsen
dc.subjectVitamin Cen
dc.subjectVitamin Een
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAntioxidantsen
dc.subject.meshAscorbic Aciden
dc.subject.meshDNA Damageen
dc.subject.meshDNA Repairen
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFruiten
dc.subject.meshGuanineen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLeukocytes, Mononuclearen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNutritional Statusen
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stressen
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen
dc.subject.meshVitamin Een
dc.titleDNA repair phenotype and dietary antioxidant supplementation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Nutritionen

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