A high intake of dietary fiber influences C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, but not glucose and lipid metabolism, in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/288555
Title:
A high intake of dietary fiber influences C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, but not glucose and lipid metabolism, in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects.
Authors:
Johansson-Persson, Anna; Ulmius, Matilda; Cloetens, Lieselotte; Karhu, Toni; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Onning, Gunilla
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate how a diet high in dietary fiber, with several fiber sources included, modulates glucose and lipid metabolism and the inflammatory response in humans. METHODS: Subjects (n = 25) aged 58.6 (1.1) years (mean and SD) with a BMI of 26.6 (0.5) kg/m(2) and a total cholesterol (TC) of 5.8 (0.1) mmol/L (mean and SEM) were given a high fiber (HF) and low fiber (LF) diet, in a randomized controlled 5-week crossover intervention, separated by a 3-week washout. The HF diet consisted of oat bran, rye bran, and sugar beet fiber incorporated into test food products; one bread roll, one ready meal, and two beverages consumed daily. Equivalent food products, without added fibers, were provided in the LF diet. RESULTS: Total dietary fiber intake was 48.0 g and 30.2 g per day for the HF and LF diet, respectively. Significant reduction in C-reactive protein (CRP) was observed between the diets (P = 0.017) and a significant reduction in fibrinogen within the HF diet (P = 0.044). There were no significant effects in other measured circulating cytokines or in glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that a 5-week high dietary fiber intake of oat bran, rye bran, and sugar beet fiber might reduce the low-grade inflammatory response measured as CRP which could, together with reduced fibrinogen, help to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Citation:
Eur. J. Nutr. 2013,
Journal:
European Journal of Nutrition
Issue Date:
7-Feb-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/288555
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-013-0496-8
PubMed ID:
23389112
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00394-013-0496-8
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1436-6215
Sponsors:
This work has been supported by a VINNOVA grant (project number 2004-02285), the Nordic Center of Excellence on Systems biology in controlled dietary interventions and cohort studies, SYSDIET (nr 070014), the European Network of Excellence NuGO (The European Nutrigenomics Organization), and the EU project ECNIS2. Biomedical Nutrition, Lund University, is a member of the NuGO Association.
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohansson-Persson, Annaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUlmius, Matildaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCloetens, Lieselotteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKarhu, Tonien_GB
dc.contributor.authorHerzig, Karl-Heinzen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOnning, Gunillaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-07T07:49:13Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-07T07:49:13Z-
dc.date.issued2013-02-07-
dc.identifier.citationEur. J. Nutr. 2013,en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1436-6215-
dc.identifier.pmid23389112-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00394-013-0496-8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/288555-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate how a diet high in dietary fiber, with several fiber sources included, modulates glucose and lipid metabolism and the inflammatory response in humans. METHODS: Subjects (n = 25) aged 58.6 (1.1) years (mean and SD) with a BMI of 26.6 (0.5) kg/m(2) and a total cholesterol (TC) of 5.8 (0.1) mmol/L (mean and SEM) were given a high fiber (HF) and low fiber (LF) diet, in a randomized controlled 5-week crossover intervention, separated by a 3-week washout. The HF diet consisted of oat bran, rye bran, and sugar beet fiber incorporated into test food products; one bread roll, one ready meal, and two beverages consumed daily. Equivalent food products, without added fibers, were provided in the LF diet. RESULTS: Total dietary fiber intake was 48.0 g and 30.2 g per day for the HF and LF diet, respectively. Significant reduction in C-reactive protein (CRP) was observed between the diets (P = 0.017) and a significant reduction in fibrinogen within the HF diet (P = 0.044). There were no significant effects in other measured circulating cytokines or in glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that a 5-week high dietary fiber intake of oat bran, rye bran, and sugar beet fiber might reduce the low-grade inflammatory response measured as CRP which could, together with reduced fibrinogen, help to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been supported by a VINNOVA grant (project number 2004-02285), the Nordic Center of Excellence on Systems biology in controlled dietary interventions and cohort studies, SYSDIET (nr 070014), the European Network of Excellence NuGO (The European Nutrigenomics Organization), and the EU project ECNIS2. Biomedical Nutrition, Lund University, is a member of the NuGO Association.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00394-013-0496-8en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of nutritionen_GB
dc.subjectDietary fiberen_GB
dc.subjectOaten_GB
dc.subjectRyeen_GB
dc.subjectSugar beeten_GB
dc.subjectHumanen_GB
dc.subjectInflammatory markersen_GB
dc.subjectC-Reactive Proteinen_GB
dc.subjectFibrinogenen_GB
dc.subjectCytokinesen_GB
dc.subjectLipiden_GB
dc.subjectGlucoseen_GB
dc.titleA high intake of dietary fiber influences C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, but not glucose and lipid metabolism, in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Nutritionen_GB

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