Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Among Never Smokers in Golestan Province, Iran, an Area of High Incidence of Esophageal Cancer - a Cross-Sectional Study with Repeated Measurement of Urinary 1-OHPG in Two Seasons.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/269634
Title:
Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Among Never Smokers in Golestan Province, Iran, an Area of High Incidence of Esophageal Cancer - a Cross-Sectional Study with Repeated Measurement of Urinary 1-OHPG in Two Seasons.
Authors:
Islami, Farhad; Boffetta, Paolo; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Strickland, Paul; Phillips, David H.; Pourshams, Akram; Fazel-Tabar Malekshah, Akbar; Godschalk, Roger; Jafari, Elham; Etemadi, Arash; Abubaker, Salahadin; Kamangar, Farin; Straif, Kurt; Møller, Henrik; Schuz, Joachim; Malekzadeh, Reza
Abstract:
Studies have suggested a possible role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the etiology of esophageal cancer in Golestan Province, Iran, where incidence of this cancer is very high. In order to investigate the patterns of non-smoking related exposure to PAHs in Golestan, we conducted a cross-sectional study collecting questionnaire data, genotyping polymorphisms related to PAH metabolism, and measuring levels of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG), a PAH metabolite, in urine samples collected in two seasons from the same group of 111 randomly selected never-smoking women. Beta-coefficients for correlations between 1-OHPG as dependent variable and other variables were calculated using linear regression models. The creatinine-adjusted 1-OHPG levels in both winter and summer samples were approximately 110 μmol/molCr (P for seasonal difference = 0.40). In winter, red meat intake (β = 0.208; P = 0.03), processed meat intake (β = 0.218; P = 0.02), and GSTT1-02 polymorphism ("null" genotype: β = 0.228; P = 0.02) showed associations with 1-OHPG levels, while CYP1B1-07 polymorphism (GG versus AA + GA genotypes: β = -0.256; P = 0.008) showed an inverse association. In summer, making bread at home (> weekly versus never: β = 0.203; P = 0.04), second-hand smoke (exposure to ≥3 cigarettes versus no exposure: β = 0.254; P = 0.01), and GSTM1-02 "null" genotype (β = 0.198; P = 0.04) showed associations with 1-OHPG levels, but GSTP1-02 polymorphism (CT + TT versus CC: β = -0.218; P = 0.03) showed an inverse association. This study confirms high exposure of the general population in Golestan to PAHs and suggests that certain foods, cooking methods, and genetic polymorphisms increase exposure to PAHs.
Citation:
Front. Oncol. 2012, 2:14
Journal:
Frontiers in Oncology
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/269634
DOI:
10.3389/fonc.2012.00014
PubMed ID:
22655262
Additional Links:
http://www.frontiersin.org/Cancer_Epidemiology_and_Prevention/10.3389/fonc.2012.00014/abstract; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356003/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2234-943X
Sponsors:
Data and sample collection was supported by Digestive Disease Research Center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and International Agency for Research on Cancer. Laboratory assessments were funded by ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program [Priority 5: “Food Quality and Safety” (Contract No. 513943)].
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIslami, Farhaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoffetta, Paoloen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVan Schooten, Frederik J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorStrickland, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, David H.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPourshams, Akramen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFazel-Tabar Malekshah, Akbaren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGodschalk, Rogeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorJafari, Elhamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEtemadi, Arashen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAbubaker, Salahadinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKamangar, Farinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStraif, Kurten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMøller, Henriken_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchuz, Joachimen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMalekzadeh, Rezaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T12:02:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-15T12:02:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationFront. Oncol. 2012, 2:14en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2234-943X-
dc.identifier.pmid22655262-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fonc.2012.00014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/269634-
dc.description.abstractStudies have suggested a possible role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the etiology of esophageal cancer in Golestan Province, Iran, where incidence of this cancer is very high. In order to investigate the patterns of non-smoking related exposure to PAHs in Golestan, we conducted a cross-sectional study collecting questionnaire data, genotyping polymorphisms related to PAH metabolism, and measuring levels of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG), a PAH metabolite, in urine samples collected in two seasons from the same group of 111 randomly selected never-smoking women. Beta-coefficients for correlations between 1-OHPG as dependent variable and other variables were calculated using linear regression models. The creatinine-adjusted 1-OHPG levels in both winter and summer samples were approximately 110 μmol/molCr (P for seasonal difference = 0.40). In winter, red meat intake (β = 0.208; P = 0.03), processed meat intake (β = 0.218; P = 0.02), and GSTT1-02 polymorphism ("null" genotype: β = 0.228; P = 0.02) showed associations with 1-OHPG levels, while CYP1B1-07 polymorphism (GG versus AA + GA genotypes: β = -0.256; P = 0.008) showed an inverse association. In summer, making bread at home (> weekly versus never: β = 0.203; P = 0.04), second-hand smoke (exposure to ≥3 cigarettes versus no exposure: β = 0.254; P = 0.01), and GSTM1-02 "null" genotype (β = 0.198; P = 0.04) showed associations with 1-OHPG levels, but GSTP1-02 polymorphism (CT + TT versus CC: β = -0.218; P = 0.03) showed an inverse association. This study confirms high exposure of the general population in Golestan to PAHs and suggests that certain foods, cooking methods, and genetic polymorphisms increase exposure to PAHs.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipData and sample collection was supported by Digestive Disease Research Center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and International Agency for Research on Cancer. Laboratory assessments were funded by ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program [Priority 5: “Food Quality and Safety” (Contract No. 513943)].en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.frontiersin.org/Cancer_Epidemiology_and_Prevention/10.3389/fonc.2012.00014/abstracten_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356003/en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers in oncologyen_GB
dc.subjectPolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbonen_GB
dc.subjectEsophageal canceren_GB
dc.subjectPolymorphismen_GB
dc.subjectSmokingen_GB
dc.subjectUrineen_GB
dc.subject1-hydroxypyrene glucuronideen_GB
dc.subjectGenotypingen_GB
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_GB
dc.subjectCross-sectional studyen_GB
dc.titleExposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Among Never Smokers in Golestan Province, Iran, an Area of High Incidence of Esophageal Cancer - a Cross-Sectional Study with Repeated Measurement of Urinary 1-OHPG in Two Seasons.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Oncologyen_GB

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in ECNIS-NIOM are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.