Nitrosamine and related food intake and gastric and oesophageal cancer risk: a systematic review of the epidemiological evidence.

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/25215
Title:
Nitrosamine and related food intake and gastric and oesophageal cancer risk: a systematic review of the epidemiological evidence.
Authors:
Jakszyn, Paula; Gonzalez, Carlos-Alberto
Abstract:
AIM: To study the association between nitrite and nitrosamine intake and gastric cancer (GC), between meat and processed meat intake, GC and oesophageal cancer (OC), and between preserved fish, vegetable and smoked food intake and GC. METHODS: In this article we reviewed all the published cohort and case-control studies from 1985-2005, and analyzed the relationship between nitrosamine and nitrite intake and the most important related food intake (meat and processed meat, preserved vegetables and fish, smoked foods and beer drinking) and GC or OC risk. Sixty-one studies, 11 cohorts and 50 case-control studies were included. RESULTS: Evidence from case-control studies supported an association between nitrite and nitrosamine intake with GC but evidence was insufficient in relation to OC. A high proportion of case-control studies found a positive association with meat intake for both tumours (11 of 16 studies on GC and 11 of 18 studies on OC). A relatively large number of case-control studies showed quite consistent results supporting a positive association between processed meat intake and GC and OC risk (10 of 14 studies on GC and 8 of 9 studies on OC). Almost all the case-control studies found a positive and significant association between preserved fish, vegetable and smoked food intake and GC. The evidence regarding OC was more limited. Overall the evidence from cohort studies was insufficient or more inconsistent than that from case-control studies. CONCLUSION: The available evidence supports a positive association between nitrite and nitrosamine intake and GC, between meat and processed meat intake and GC and OC, and between preserved fish, vegetable and smoked food intake and GC, but is not conclusive.
Citation:
World J. Gastroenterol. 2006, 12 (27):4296-303
Journal:
World journal of gastroenterology : WJG
Issue Date:
21-Jul-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/25215
PubMed ID:
16865769
Additional Links:
http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/12/4296.asp
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1007-9327
Sponsors:
Supported by a fellowship of the ‘Fundació Privada Institut D’investigacio Biomédica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) and partially funded by the ISCIII network (RCESP C03/09) Spain and ECNIS Network from the 6FP of the EC
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJakszyn, Paula-
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Carlos-Alberto-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-09T10:59:58Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-09T10:59:58Z-
dc.date.issued2006-07-21-
dc.identifier.citationWorld J. Gastroenterol. 2006, 12 (27):4296-303en
dc.identifier.issn1007-9327-
dc.identifier.pmid16865769-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/25215-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To study the association between nitrite and nitrosamine intake and gastric cancer (GC), between meat and processed meat intake, GC and oesophageal cancer (OC), and between preserved fish, vegetable and smoked food intake and GC. METHODS: In this article we reviewed all the published cohort and case-control studies from 1985-2005, and analyzed the relationship between nitrosamine and nitrite intake and the most important related food intake (meat and processed meat, preserved vegetables and fish, smoked foods and beer drinking) and GC or OC risk. Sixty-one studies, 11 cohorts and 50 case-control studies were included. RESULTS: Evidence from case-control studies supported an association between nitrite and nitrosamine intake with GC but evidence was insufficient in relation to OC. A high proportion of case-control studies found a positive association with meat intake for both tumours (11 of 16 studies on GC and 11 of 18 studies on OC). A relatively large number of case-control studies showed quite consistent results supporting a positive association between processed meat intake and GC and OC risk (10 of 14 studies on GC and 8 of 9 studies on OC). Almost all the case-control studies found a positive and significant association between preserved fish, vegetable and smoked food intake and GC. The evidence regarding OC was more limited. Overall the evidence from cohort studies was insufficient or more inconsistent than that from case-control studies. CONCLUSION: The available evidence supports a positive association between nitrite and nitrosamine intake and GC, between meat and processed meat intake and GC and OC, and between preserved fish, vegetable and smoked food intake and GC, but is not conclusive.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by a fellowship of the ‘Fundació Privada Institut D’investigacio Biomédica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) and partially funded by the ISCIII network (RCESP C03/09) Spain and ECNIS Network from the 6FP of the ECen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/12/4296.aspen
dc.subjectNitritesen
dc.subjectN-nitrosodimethylamineen
dc.subjectNitroso-compoundsen
dc.subjectDietary intakeen
dc.subjectGastric canceren
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshEsophageal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshFish Products-
dc.subject.meshFood Preservation-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMeat Products-
dc.subject.meshNitrates-
dc.subject.meshNitrosamines-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshStomach Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshVegetables-
dc.titleNitrosamine and related food intake and gastric and oesophageal cancer risk: a systematic review of the epidemiological evidence.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalWorld journal of gastroenterology : WJGen

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