Vitamins at physiological levels cause oxidation to the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine and to DNA--alone or in synergism with metals.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/218517
Title:
Vitamins at physiological levels cause oxidation to the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine and to DNA--alone or in synergism with metals.
Authors:
Bergstrom, Therese; Ersson, Clara; Bergman, Jan; Moller, Lennart
Abstract:
Vitamins with antioxidant properties have the ability to act as pro-oxidants, inducing oxidative damage and oxidative stress as opposed to preventing it. While vitamin supplements are commonly consumed, the scientific evidence for their health beneficial effects is inconclusive. In fact, even harmful effects have been reported. The present study aimed to investigate and compare pro-oxidant properties of different antioxidants and vitamins commonly found in dietary supplements, at concentrations of physiological relevance, alone or in combination with metals also found in supplements. Focus was on damages related to DNA. The vitamins' chemical oxidation potencies were studied by measuring the amount of the oxidation product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formed from the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine (dG) after vitamin exposure, using a high-performance liquid chromatography system with electrochemical and ultraviolet detection. To study the vitamins' ability to cause DNA damage to cultured cells, promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) were exposed to vitamins, and strand breaks, alkali-labile sites and oxidative DNA lesions, i.e. formamido pyrimidine DNA glycosylase-sensitive sites, were detected using the comet assay. Vitamins A and C chemically induced oxidation of dG, alone and in synergism with iron or copper, whereas only vitamin C and copper induced DNA damage in cultured cells. Contrary, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and B12, β-carotene, folic acid, α-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol did not induce oxidative damage to dG, while lycopene induced a weak dose-response increase. Taken together, vitamin C and copper stood out with the strongest oxidative potency, which is of potential concern since both substances are commonly found in multivitamins.
Citation:
Mutagenesis 2012, 27 (4):511-517
Journal:
Mutagenesis
Issue Date:
30-Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/218517
DOI:
10.1093/mutage/ges013
PubMed ID:
22466670
Additional Links:
http://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/03/29/mutage.ges013.long
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-3804
Sponsors:
The authors are members of ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: “Food Quality and Safety” (Contract No. 513943).
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBergstrom, Thereseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorErsson, Claraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBergman, Janen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Lennarten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-16T12:48:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-16T12:48:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-30-
dc.identifier.citationMutagenesis 2012, 27 (4):511-517en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1464-3804-
dc.identifier.pmid22466670-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mutage/ges013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/218517-
dc.description.abstractVitamins with antioxidant properties have the ability to act as pro-oxidants, inducing oxidative damage and oxidative stress as opposed to preventing it. While vitamin supplements are commonly consumed, the scientific evidence for their health beneficial effects is inconclusive. In fact, even harmful effects have been reported. The present study aimed to investigate and compare pro-oxidant properties of different antioxidants and vitamins commonly found in dietary supplements, at concentrations of physiological relevance, alone or in combination with metals also found in supplements. Focus was on damages related to DNA. The vitamins' chemical oxidation potencies were studied by measuring the amount of the oxidation product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formed from the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine (dG) after vitamin exposure, using a high-performance liquid chromatography system with electrochemical and ultraviolet detection. To study the vitamins' ability to cause DNA damage to cultured cells, promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) were exposed to vitamins, and strand breaks, alkali-labile sites and oxidative DNA lesions, i.e. formamido pyrimidine DNA glycosylase-sensitive sites, were detected using the comet assay. Vitamins A and C chemically induced oxidation of dG, alone and in synergism with iron or copper, whereas only vitamin C and copper induced DNA damage in cultured cells. Contrary, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and B12, β-carotene, folic acid, α-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol did not induce oxidative damage to dG, while lycopene induced a weak dose-response increase. Taken together, vitamin C and copper stood out with the strongest oxidative potency, which is of potential concern since both substances are commonly found in multivitamins.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are members of ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: “Food Quality and Safety” (Contract No. 513943).en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/03/29/mutage.ges013.longen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Mutagenesisen_GB
dc.subjectAntioxidantsen_GB
dc.subjectVitaminsen_GB
dc.subjectMetalsen_GB
dc.subjectSupplementsen_GB
dc.subjectDNA damageen_GB
dc.subjectComet assayen_GB
dc.subjectSynergismen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntioxidantsen
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquiden
dc.subject.meshComet Assayen
dc.subject.meshDNAen
dc.subject.meshDNA Damageen
dc.subject.meshDNA-Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylaseen
dc.subject.meshDeoxyguanosineen
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshDrug Synergismen
dc.subject.meshHL-60 Cellsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMetalsen
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stressen
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Speciesen
dc.subject.meshVitaminsen
dc.titleVitamins at physiological levels cause oxidation to the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine and to DNA--alone or in synergism with metals.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMutagenesisen_GB

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