Vitamin A and C compounds permitted in supplements differ in their abilities to affect cell viability, DNA and the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/199953
Title:
Vitamin A and C compounds permitted in supplements differ in their abilities to affect cell viability, DNA and the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine.
Authors:
Bergstrom, Therese; Bergman, Jan; Moller, Lennart
Abstract:
In accordance with the European Parliament and Council's directive, vitamin A and C supplements can include any of four (vitamin A) or five (vitamin C) specified compounds. This study focuses on these compounds and compares their abilities to affect the DNA and viability of cells in culture, but also their potencies to chemically oxidise the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine (dG). To study the vitamins' strict chemical oxidation potencies, dG was exposed to vitamin solution and the amount of the oxidation product 8'-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formed was estimated using a high-performance liquid chromatography system with electrochemical and ultraviolet detection. The vitamin's ability to cause DNA damage to promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60), as detected by strand breaks, alkaline labile sites and formamido pyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites was, after vitamin exposure, measured using the comet assay and cytotoxicity was estimated using trypan blue staining. The results highlight that vitamin A and C compounds found in supplements do have different properties, chemically as well as in a cellular system. Among the vitamin C compounds, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate stood out causing both oxidation to dG and cytotoxicity to cells. The vitamin A compounds retinol, retinyl acetate and retinal (a breakdown product found in vivo) caused oxidation of dG, while retinal was the only compound causing cytotoxicity, giving rise to an almost complete cell death. β-carotene caused, as the only vitamin compound, a small increase in FPG-sensitive sites. It is concluded that even though the compounds are found under the same name (vitamin A or C), they do have different properties linked to oxidation, cytotoxicity and DNA damage.
Citation:
Mutagenesis 2011, 26 (6):735-744
Journal:
Mutagenesis
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/199953
DOI:
10.1093/mutage/ger041
PubMed ID:
21778356
Additional Links:
http://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/6/735.long
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-3804
Sponsors:
Authors of this paper are partners of ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a Network of Excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Programme, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (Contract No. 513943).
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBergstrom, Thereseen
dc.contributor.authorBergman, Janen
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Lennarten
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-04T10:52:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-04T10:52:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationMutagenesis 2011, 26 (6):735-744en
dc.identifier.issn1464-3804-
dc.identifier.pmid21778356-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mutage/ger041-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/199953-
dc.description.abstractIn accordance with the European Parliament and Council's directive, vitamin A and C supplements can include any of four (vitamin A) or five (vitamin C) specified compounds. This study focuses on these compounds and compares their abilities to affect the DNA and viability of cells in culture, but also their potencies to chemically oxidise the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine (dG). To study the vitamins' strict chemical oxidation potencies, dG was exposed to vitamin solution and the amount of the oxidation product 8'-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formed was estimated using a high-performance liquid chromatography system with electrochemical and ultraviolet detection. The vitamin's ability to cause DNA damage to promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60), as detected by strand breaks, alkaline labile sites and formamido pyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites was, after vitamin exposure, measured using the comet assay and cytotoxicity was estimated using trypan blue staining. The results highlight that vitamin A and C compounds found in supplements do have different properties, chemically as well as in a cellular system. Among the vitamin C compounds, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate stood out causing both oxidation to dG and cytotoxicity to cells. The vitamin A compounds retinol, retinyl acetate and retinal (a breakdown product found in vivo) caused oxidation of dG, while retinal was the only compound causing cytotoxicity, giving rise to an almost complete cell death. β-carotene caused, as the only vitamin compound, a small increase in FPG-sensitive sites. It is concluded that even though the compounds are found under the same name (vitamin A or C), they do have different properties linked to oxidation, cytotoxicity and DNA damage.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAuthors of this paper are partners of ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a Network of Excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Programme, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (Contract No. 513943).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://mutage.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/6/735.longen
dc.subjectDNA damageen
dc.subjectCytotoxicityen
dc.subjectVitamin Aen
dc.subjectVitamin Cen
dc.subjectCell cultureen
dc.subjectComet assayen
dc.subjectDNA nucleoside deoxyguanosineen
dc.subject.meshAscorbic Aciden
dc.subject.meshCell Deathen
dc.subject.meshCell Survivalen
dc.subject.meshComet Assayen
dc.subject.meshDNAen
dc.subject.meshDNA Damageen
dc.subject.meshDNA-Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylaseen
dc.subject.meshDeoxyguanosineen
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshHL-60 Cellsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen
dc.subject.meshVitamin Aen
dc.titleVitamin A and C compounds permitted in supplements differ in their abilities to affect cell viability, DNA and the DNA nucleoside deoxyguanosine.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMutagenesisen
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