Activated neutrophils inhibit nucleotide excision repair in human pulmonary epithelial cells: role of myeloperoxidase.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/19117
Title:
Activated neutrophils inhibit nucleotide excision repair in human pulmonary epithelial cells: role of myeloperoxidase.
Authors:
Güngör, Nejla; Godschalk, Roger W.L.; Pachen, Daniëlle M.; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Knaapen, Ad M.
Abstract:
Neutrophils are thought to affect pulmonary carcinogenesis by promoting the metabolism of inhaled chemical carcinogens, causing enhanced formation of promutagenic DNA adducts. We hypothesized that neutrophils interfere with the removal of such DNA adducts by inhibiting nucleotide excision repair (NER) in target cells. Human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) were cocultured with activated neutrophils, and we observed a significant reduction of NER in the A549 cells, which was abrogated by addition of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. The inhibitory effect of neutrophils could be mimicked by the MPO product hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which caused an acute, dose-dependent inhibition of NER in A549 cells. This was independent of cytotoxicity or ATP loss and persisted up to 24 h. These data were supported by showing that HOCl caused a delayed removal of DNA adducts in benzo[a]pyrene-diolepoxide-exposed A549 cells. The acute HOCl-induced inhibition of NER can only partly be explained by oxidative modification of repair proteins. To explain the more persistent effects of HOCl, we analyzed the expression of NER genes and found that HOCl significantly reduced XPC expression. In conclusion, these data indicate that neutrophils are potent inhibitors of nucleotide excision repair. This may provide a further biological explanation for the association between inflammation and lung cancer development.
Citation:
FASEB J. 2007, 21 (10):2359-67.
Publisher:
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Journal:
The FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Issue Date:
Aug-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/19117
DOI:
10.1096/fj.07-8163com
PubMed ID:
17440118
Additional Links:
http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/full/21/10/2359
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1530-6860
Sponsors:
We thank Yonca Güngör for linguistically reviewing the manuscript. We are grateful for financial support from the Province of Limburg, The Netherlands. Part of the study was supported by the European Network of Excellence (NoE) "Environmental Cancer, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility" (ECNIS), Sixth Framework program (FP6), FOOD-CT-2005–513943. A. M. Knaapen is supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO, VENI-grant 916.46.092).
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGüngör, Nejla-
dc.contributor.authorGodschalk, Roger W.L.-
dc.contributor.authorPachen, Daniëlle M.-
dc.contributor.authorVan Schooten, Frederik J.-
dc.contributor.authorKnaapen, Ad M.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-25T11:04:02Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-25T11:04:02Z-
dc.date.issued2007-08-
dc.identifier.citationFASEB J. 2007, 21 (10):2359-67.en
dc.identifier.issn1530-6860-
dc.identifier.pmid17440118-
dc.identifier.doi10.1096/fj.07-8163com-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/19117-
dc.description.abstractNeutrophils are thought to affect pulmonary carcinogenesis by promoting the metabolism of inhaled chemical carcinogens, causing enhanced formation of promutagenic DNA adducts. We hypothesized that neutrophils interfere with the removal of such DNA adducts by inhibiting nucleotide excision repair (NER) in target cells. Human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) were cocultured with activated neutrophils, and we observed a significant reduction of NER in the A549 cells, which was abrogated by addition of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. The inhibitory effect of neutrophils could be mimicked by the MPO product hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which caused an acute, dose-dependent inhibition of NER in A549 cells. This was independent of cytotoxicity or ATP loss and persisted up to 24 h. These data were supported by showing that HOCl caused a delayed removal of DNA adducts in benzo[a]pyrene-diolepoxide-exposed A549 cells. The acute HOCl-induced inhibition of NER can only partly be explained by oxidative modification of repair proteins. To explain the more persistent effects of HOCl, we analyzed the expression of NER genes and found that HOCl significantly reduced XPC expression. In conclusion, these data indicate that neutrophils are potent inhibitors of nucleotide excision repair. This may provide a further biological explanation for the association between inflammation and lung cancer development.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Yonca Güngör for linguistically reviewing the manuscript. We are grateful for financial support from the Province of Limburg, The Netherlands. Part of the study was supported by the European Network of Excellence (NoE) "Environmental Cancer, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility" (ECNIS), Sixth Framework program (FP6), FOOD-CT-2005–513943. A. M. Knaapen is supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO, VENI-grant 916.46.092).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/full/21/10/2359en
dc.subjectDNA adductsen
dc.subjectDNA repairen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectlung canceren
dc.subject.mesh7,8-Dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene 9,10-oxide-
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Tumor-
dc.subject.meshDNA Adducts-
dc.subject.meshDNA Repair-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLung-
dc.subject.meshNeutrophil Activation-
dc.subject.meshPeroxidase-
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Mucosa-
dc.titleActivated neutrophils inhibit nucleotide excision repair in human pulmonary epithelial cells: role of myeloperoxidase.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biologyen

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