Assessment of cumulative evidence on genetic associations: interim guidelines.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/19114
Title:
Assessment of cumulative evidence on genetic associations: interim guidelines.
Authors:
Ioannidis, John P.A; Boffetta, Paolo; Little, Julian; O'Brien, Thomas R.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vineis, Paolo; Balding, David J.; Chokkalingam, Anand; Dolan, Siobhan M.; Flanders, W Dana; Higgins, Julian P.T; McCarthy, Mark I.; McDermott, David H.; Page, Grier P.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Seminara, Daniela; Khoury, Muin J.
Abstract:
Established guidelines for causal inference in epidemiological studies may be inappropriate for genetic associations. A consensus process was used to develop guidance criteria for assessing cumulative epidemiologic evidence in genetic associations. A proposed semi-quantitative index assigns three levels for the amount of evidence, extent of replication, and protection from bias, and also generates a composite assessment of 'strong', 'moderate' or 'weak' epidemiological credibility. In addition, we discuss how additional input and guidance can be derived from biological data. Future empirical research and consensus development are needed to develop an integrated model for combining epidemiological and biological evidence in the rapidly evolving field of investigation of genetic factors.
Citation:
Int J Epidemiol 2008, 37 (1):120-32.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
International Journal of Epidemiology
Issue Date:
Feb-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/19114
DOI:
10.1093/ije/dym159
PubMed ID:
17898028
Additional Links:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/37/1/120
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-3685
Sponsors:
This work was partly supported by ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program (Contract No 513943). This research was also supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the US Government.
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIoannidis, John P.A-
dc.contributor.authorBoffetta, Paolo-
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Julian-
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Thomas R.-
dc.contributor.authorUitterlinden, Andre G.-
dc.contributor.authorVineis, Paolo-
dc.contributor.authorBalding, David J.-
dc.contributor.authorChokkalingam, Anand-
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Siobhan M.-
dc.contributor.authorFlanders, W Dana-
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Julian P.T-
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Mark I.-
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, David H.-
dc.contributor.authorPage, Grier P.-
dc.contributor.authorRebbeck, Timothy R.-
dc.contributor.authorSeminara, Daniela-
dc.contributor.authorKhoury, Muin J.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-25T10:50:38Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-25T10:50:38Z-
dc.date.issued2008-02-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Epidemiol 2008, 37 (1):120-32.en
dc.identifier.issn1464-3685-
dc.identifier.pmid17898028-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/dym159-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/19114-
dc.description.abstractEstablished guidelines for causal inference in epidemiological studies may be inappropriate for genetic associations. A consensus process was used to develop guidance criteria for assessing cumulative epidemiologic evidence in genetic associations. A proposed semi-quantitative index assigns three levels for the amount of evidence, extent of replication, and protection from bias, and also generates a composite assessment of 'strong', 'moderate' or 'weak' epidemiological credibility. In addition, we discuss how additional input and guidance can be derived from biological data. Future empirical research and consensus development are needed to develop an integrated model for combining epidemiological and biological evidence in the rapidly evolving field of investigation of genetic factors.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partly supported by ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program (Contract No 513943). This research was also supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the US Government.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/37/1/120en
dc.subjectepidemiologic methodsen
dc.subjectgeneticsen
dc.subjectgenomicsen
dc.subjectcausalityen
dc.subjectevidenceen
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEvaluation Studies as Topicen
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Medicineen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Heterogeneityen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshGuidelines as Topicen
dc.subject.meshHeterozygote Detectionen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.titleAssessment of cumulative evidence on genetic associations: interim guidelines.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen
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