Sensitivity and specificity of techniques for the identification of biomarkers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/17396
Title:
Sensitivity and specificity of techniques for the identification of biomarkers.
Authors:
Farmer, Peter B.; Phillips, David; Moller, Lennart; Singh, Raj; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Godschalk, Roger; Mateuca, Raluca; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline
Abstract:
The approaches described for the determination of DNA adducts mostly reach sensitivity limits in the range of 1 adduct/107–109 nucleotides and are thus applicable for studies of environmental exposure to genotoxins. Availability of DNA may be a limiting feature and the kind of sample required will determine how a method is used in human biomonitoring studies. Protein adducts are generally stable and are therefore very suitable for use as biomarkers of exposure. The sensitivity of the mass spectral approaches for these assays has been shown to be sufficient for detection of adducts at low pmol/g protein levels. However, there is a lack of a screening method for characterisation of exposures to complex mixtures and no really high throughput analytical methods,preferable for large-scale human molecular epidemiological studies, exist. Structural chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been widely used in occupational and environmental settings as a biomarker of early effects of geno-toxic carcinogens. The predictivity of chromosomal aberrations as a biomarker for increased cancer risk may depend on the composition of the cohorts included in the study. The use of micronuclei as a measure of chromosomal damage has become a standard assay in both genetic toxicology testing and human biomonitoring studies. Analysis of re-sults from European cohorts indicated that subjects with cancer had a significant increase in frequency of micronuclei.
Citation:
In: Biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and early effects. Ed. Peter B. Farmer, Jean M. Emeny. Lodz 2006, p. 17-61.
Publisher:
The Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/17396
Additional Links:
http://www.ecnis.org/images/stories/ecnis/documents/reports/Biomarkers/2.sensitivity...%2017-61.pdf
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
2.1. DNA adducts 2.2. Protein adducts 2.3. Chromosomal damage
Series/Report no.:
ECNIS Report; 1
ISBN:
83-88261-78-9; 978-83-88261-78-1
Sponsors:
ECNIS Network of Excellence.
Appears in Collections:
Chapters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Peter B.-
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, David-
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Lennart-
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Raj-
dc.contributor.authorvan Schooten, Frederik-Jan-
dc.contributor.authorGodschalk, Roger-
dc.contributor.authorMateuca, Raluca-
dc.contributor.authorKirsch-Volders, Micheline-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-04T09:09:16Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-04T09:09:16Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and early effects. Ed. Peter B. Farmer, Jean M. Emeny. Lodz 2006, p. 17-61.en
dc.identifier.isbn83-88261-78-9-
dc.identifier.isbn978-83-88261-78-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/17396-
dc.description2.1. DNA adducts 2.2. Protein adducts 2.3. Chromosomal damageen
dc.description.abstractThe approaches described for the determination of DNA adducts mostly reach sensitivity limits in the range of 1 adduct/107–109 nucleotides and are thus applicable for studies of environmental exposure to genotoxins. Availability of DNA may be a limiting feature and the kind of sample required will determine how a method is used in human biomonitoring studies. Protein adducts are generally stable and are therefore very suitable for use as biomarkers of exposure. The sensitivity of the mass spectral approaches for these assays has been shown to be sufficient for detection of adducts at low pmol/g protein levels. However, there is a lack of a screening method for characterisation of exposures to complex mixtures and no really high throughput analytical methods,preferable for large-scale human molecular epidemiological studies, exist. Structural chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been widely used in occupational and environmental settings as a biomarker of early effects of geno-toxic carcinogens. The predictivity of chromosomal aberrations as a biomarker for increased cancer risk may depend on the composition of the cohorts included in the study. The use of micronuclei as a measure of chromosomal damage has become a standard assay in both genetic toxicology testing and human biomonitoring studies. Analysis of re-sults from European cohorts indicated that subjects with cancer had a significant increase in frequency of micronuclei.en
dc.description.sponsorshipECNIS Network of Excellence.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicineen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesECNIS Reporten
dc.relation.ispartofseries1en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ecnis.org/images/stories/ecnis/documents/reports/Biomarkers/2.sensitivity...%2017-61.pdfen
dc.subjectDNAen
dc.subjectP-HPLCen
dc.subjectbiomarkersen
dc.subjectproteinen
dc.subjectdamageen
dc.subjectIdentification techniquesen
dc.titleSensitivity and specificity of techniques for the identification of biomarkers.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
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