Human biomonitoring in Flanders: some aspects related to study design, future, communication and ethics.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/115656
Title:
Human biomonitoring in Flanders: some aspects related to study design, future, communication and ethics.
Authors:
Hond, Elly Den; Chovanova, Hana; Dumez, Birgit; Keune, Hans; Schoeters, Greet; Teughels, Caroline; Van Campenhout, Karen
Abstract:
Flanders is one of the few places in Europe with a legal basis to perform human biomonitoring (HBM). The HBM study is commissioned, steered and funded by the Flemish government and is carried out by the Center of Expertise for Environment and Health. This research consortium includes scientists from all Flemish universities and two Flemish research institutes. The main purpose of the Flemish HBM program is to establish a surveillance network to make it possible to measure environmental pollution in the population and to investigate the relation between exposure and early health effects. In the first campaign (2001-2006) the question was whether living in different areas in Flanders resulted in a different exposure to environmental pollution. To make the translation of the HBM results into policy measures, the phased action plan was developed. The second cycle of the Flemish HBM programme (2007-2011) is built on two pillars. First, reference values for the Flemish population will be obtained in a representative population sample for a broad series of pollutants. Second, targeted HBM will be performed in specific groups with a concern for environmental pollution pressure, the so-called hot spots. In both parts of the project, emphasis is placed on open and transparent communication and relevant interaction between scientists, policy makers, authorities, stakeholders and the public through a participative process. HBM requires the collaboration of volunteers to donate blood, urine or other bodily tissues, and thus raises inevitable ethical questions. Some aspects showing that communication is at the heart of ethics are presented, as well as some difficulties from within the practices that arise in transnational research context.
Citation:
BEH Special edition 2009, 9-13
Journal:
Bulletin Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire
Issue Date:
16-Jun-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/115656
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Sponsors:
The work on ethics was partly supported by ECNIS NoE (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility) (Contract No 513943), and NewGeneris IP (Contract No 016320-2), operating within the European Union 6th Framework Programme, Priority 5: "Food Quality and Safety"
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHond, Elly Denen
dc.contributor.authorChovanova, Hanaen
dc.contributor.authorDumez, Birgiten
dc.contributor.authorKeune, Hansen
dc.contributor.authorSchoeters, Greeten
dc.contributor.authorTeughels, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorVan Campenhout, Karenen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-16T15:15:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-16T15:15:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06-16-
dc.identifier.citationBEH Special edition 2009, 9-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/115656-
dc.description.abstractFlanders is one of the few places in Europe with a legal basis to perform human biomonitoring (HBM). The HBM study is commissioned, steered and funded by the Flemish government and is carried out by the Center of Expertise for Environment and Health. This research consortium includes scientists from all Flemish universities and two Flemish research institutes. The main purpose of the Flemish HBM program is to establish a surveillance network to make it possible to measure environmental pollution in the population and to investigate the relation between exposure and early health effects. In the first campaign (2001-2006) the question was whether living in different areas in Flanders resulted in a different exposure to environmental pollution. To make the translation of the HBM results into policy measures, the phased action plan was developed. The second cycle of the Flemish HBM programme (2007-2011) is built on two pillars. First, reference values for the Flemish population will be obtained in a representative population sample for a broad series of pollutants. Second, targeted HBM will be performed in specific groups with a concern for environmental pollution pressure, the so-called hot spots. In both parts of the project, emphasis is placed on open and transparent communication and relevant interaction between scientists, policy makers, authorities, stakeholders and the public through a participative process. HBM requires the collaboration of volunteers to donate blood, urine or other bodily tissues, and thus raises inevitable ethical questions. Some aspects showing that communication is at the heart of ethics are presented, as well as some difficulties from within the practices that arise in transnational research context.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work on ethics was partly supported by ECNIS NoE (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility) (Contract No 513943), and NewGeneris IP (Contract No 016320-2), operating within the European Union 6th Framework Programme, Priority 5: "Food Quality and Safety"en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBiomonitoringen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subjectSurveillanceen
dc.subjectFlandersen
dc.titleHuman biomonitoring in Flanders: some aspects related to study design, future, communication and ethics.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBulletin Epidemiologique Hebdomadaireen
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