2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/114939
Title:
The comet assay in nanotoxicology research.
Authors:
Karlsson, Hanna L.
Abstract:
Nanoscale particles can have impressive and useful characteristics, but the same properties may be problematic for human health. From this perspective it is critical to assess the ability of nanoparticles to cause DNA damage. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in nanotoxicology research. In the alkaline version of the assay, DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites are detected and oxidatively damaged DNA can be analyzed using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. The article reviews studies that have used the comet assay to investigate the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles. It is shown that at least 46 cellular in vitro studies and several in vivo studies have used the comet assay and that the majority of the nanoparticles tested cause DNA strand breaks or oxidative DNA lesions. This is not surprising considering the sensitivity of the method and the reactivity of many nanomaterials. Interactions between the particles and the assay cannot be totally excluded and need further consideration. It is concluded that studies including several particle types, to enable the assessment of their relative potency, are valuable as are studies focusing both on comet assay end points and mutagenicity. Finally, the article discusses the potential future use of the comet assay in human biomonitoring studies, which could provide valuable information for hazard identification of nanoparticles.
Citation:
Anal Bioanal Chem 2010, 398 (2):651-666
Journal:
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Issue Date:
Sep-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/114939
DOI:
10.1007/s00216-010-3977-0
PubMed ID:
20640410
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/105lq47703343141/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1618-2650
Sponsors:
The author is a member of Stockholm Particle Group (SPG) as well as a partner of ECNIS, a network of excellence operating within the European Union Sixth Framework Programme, priority 5: "Food Quality and Safety" (contract no. 513943).
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Hanna L.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-08T11:47:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-08T11:47:45Z-
dc.date.issued2010-09-
dc.identifier.citationAnal Bioanal Chem 2010, 398 (2):651-666en
dc.identifier.issn1618-2650-
dc.identifier.pmid20640410-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00216-010-3977-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/114939-
dc.description.abstractNanoscale particles can have impressive and useful characteristics, but the same properties may be problematic for human health. From this perspective it is critical to assess the ability of nanoparticles to cause DNA damage. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in nanotoxicology research. In the alkaline version of the assay, DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites are detected and oxidatively damaged DNA can be analyzed using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. The article reviews studies that have used the comet assay to investigate the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles. It is shown that at least 46 cellular in vitro studies and several in vivo studies have used the comet assay and that the majority of the nanoparticles tested cause DNA strand breaks or oxidative DNA lesions. This is not surprising considering the sensitivity of the method and the reactivity of many nanomaterials. Interactions between the particles and the assay cannot be totally excluded and need further consideration. It is concluded that studies including several particle types, to enable the assessment of their relative potency, are valuable as are studies focusing both on comet assay end points and mutagenicity. Finally, the article discusses the potential future use of the comet assay in human biomonitoring studies, which could provide valuable information for hazard identification of nanoparticles.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe author is a member of Stockholm Particle Group (SPG) as well as a partner of ECNIS, a network of excellence operating within the European Union Sixth Framework Programme, priority 5: "Food Quality and Safety" (contract no. 513943).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/105lq47703343141/en
dc.subjectNanomaterialsen
dc.subjectParticlesen
dc.subjectGenotoxicityen
dc.subjectToxicityen
dc.subjectTest methodsen
dc.subjectComet Assayen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshComet Assayen
dc.subject.meshDNAen
dc.subject.meshDNA Damageen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.titleThe comet assay in nanotoxicology research.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistryen

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