Occupational exposures contribute to educational inequalities in lung cancer incidence among men: Evidence from the EPIC prospective cohort study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/114765
Title:
Occupational exposures contribute to educational inequalities in lung cancer incidence among men: Evidence from the EPIC prospective cohort study.
Authors:
Menvielle, Gwenn; Boshuizen, Hendriek; Kunst, Anton E.; Vineis, Paolo; Dalton, Susanne O.; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Hermann, Silke; Veglia, Fabrizio; Ferrari, Pietro; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Tjonneland, Anne; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Rodriguez, Laudina; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Arozena, Jone Miren Altzibar; Cirera, Lluis; Ardanaz, Eva; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boffetta, Paolo; Duell, Eric; Slimani, Nadia; Gallo, Valentina; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
Abstract:
The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent occupational exposures may explain socioeconomic inequalities in lung cancer incidence after adjusting for smoking and dietary factors. Analyses were based on a subsample of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study), a prospective cohort. The analyses included 703 incident lung cancer cases among men in Denmark, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Spain and Greece. The socioeconomic position was measured using the highest level of education. The estimates of relative indices of inequality (RII) were computed with Cox regression models. We first adjusted for smoking (with detailed information on duration and quantity) and dietary factors (fruits and vegetables consumption) and then for occupational exposures. The exposure to three carcinogens [asbestos, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)] was analyzed. The occupational exposures explained 14% of the socioeconomic inequalities remaining after adjustment for smoking and fruits and vegetables consumption. The inequalities remained nevertheless statistically significant. The RII decreased from 1.87 (95% CI: 1.36-2.56) to 1.75 (1.27-2.41). The decrease was more pronounced when adjusting for asbestos than for heavy metals or PAH. Analyses by birth cohort suggested an effect of occupational exposures among older men, while due to small number of endpoints, no conclusion could be drawn about the role of occupational exposures in educational inequalities among younger men. Our study revealed that the impact of occupational exposures on socioeconomic inequalities in cancer incidence, rarely studied until now, exists while of modest magnitude.
Citation:
Int. J. Cancer 2010, 126 (8):1928-35
Journal:
International Journal of Cancer. Journal international du cancer
Issue Date:
15-Apr-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/114765
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.24924
PubMed ID:
19810107
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.24924/abstract;jsessionid=B27FA841E6B713C8166BAF7AF3D5ED28.d02t02; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2873305/?tool=pubmed
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1097-0215
Sponsors:
Some authors are partners of Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility, a network of excellence of the European Commission (6FP contract 513943). Antonio Agudo and Paolo Vineis were supported by ECNIS.
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMenvielle, Gwennen
dc.contributor.authorBoshuizen, Hendrieken
dc.contributor.authorKunst, Anton E.en
dc.contributor.authorVineis, Paoloen
dc.contributor.authorDalton, Susanne O.en
dc.contributor.authorBergmann, Manuela M.en
dc.contributor.authorHermann, Silkeen
dc.contributor.authorVeglia, Fabrizioen
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Pietroen
dc.contributor.authorOvervad, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorRaaschou-Nielsen, Oleen
dc.contributor.authorTjonneland, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorKaaks, Rudolfen
dc.contributor.authorLinseisen, Jakoben
dc.contributor.authorPalli, Domenicoen
dc.contributor.authorKrogh, Vittorioen
dc.contributor.authorTumino, Rosarioen
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Laudinaen
dc.contributor.authorAgudo, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Maria-Joseen
dc.contributor.authorArozena, Jone Miren Altzibaren
dc.contributor.authorCirera, Lluisen
dc.contributor.authorArdanaz, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorBingham, Sheilaen
dc.contributor.authorKhaw, Kay-Teeen
dc.contributor.authorBoffetta, Paoloen
dc.contributor.authorDuell, Ericen
dc.contributor.authorSlimani, Nadiaen
dc.contributor.authorGallo, Valentinaen
dc.contributor.authorRiboli, Elioen
dc.contributor.authorBueno-de-Mesquita, H. Basen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-05T09:12:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-05T09:12:39Z-
dc.date.issued2010-04-15-
dc.identifier.citationInt. J. Cancer 2010, 126 (8):1928-35en
dc.identifier.issn1097-0215-
dc.identifier.pmid19810107-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.24924-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/114765-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study is to investigate to what extent occupational exposures may explain socioeconomic inequalities in lung cancer incidence after adjusting for smoking and dietary factors. Analyses were based on a subsample of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study), a prospective cohort. The analyses included 703 incident lung cancer cases among men in Denmark, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Spain and Greece. The socioeconomic position was measured using the highest level of education. The estimates of relative indices of inequality (RII) were computed with Cox regression models. We first adjusted for smoking (with detailed information on duration and quantity) and dietary factors (fruits and vegetables consumption) and then for occupational exposures. The exposure to three carcinogens [asbestos, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)] was analyzed. The occupational exposures explained 14% of the socioeconomic inequalities remaining after adjustment for smoking and fruits and vegetables consumption. The inequalities remained nevertheless statistically significant. The RII decreased from 1.87 (95% CI: 1.36-2.56) to 1.75 (1.27-2.41). The decrease was more pronounced when adjusting for asbestos than for heavy metals or PAH. Analyses by birth cohort suggested an effect of occupational exposures among older men, while due to small number of endpoints, no conclusion could be drawn about the role of occupational exposures in educational inequalities among younger men. Our study revealed that the impact of occupational exposures on socioeconomic inequalities in cancer incidence, rarely studied until now, exists while of modest magnitude.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSome authors are partners of Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility, a network of excellence of the European Commission (6FP contract 513943). Antonio Agudo and Paolo Vineis were supported by ECNIS.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.24924/abstract;jsessionid=B27FA841E6B713C8166BAF7AF3D5ED28.d02t02en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2873305/?tool=pubmeden
dc.subjectLung Neoplasmsen
dc.subjectOccupational Exposureen
dc.subjectIncidenceen
dc.subjectEducational Statusen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshEducational Status-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposure-
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Models-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.titleOccupational exposures contribute to educational inequalities in lung cancer incidence among men: Evidence from the EPIC prospective cohort study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Cancer. Journal international du canceren

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