Application of OMICS technologies in occupational and environmental health research; current status and projections.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/113568
Title:
Application of OMICS technologies in occupational and environmental health research; current status and projections.
Authors:
Vlaanderen, J.; Moore, L. E.; Smith, M. T.; Lan, Q.; Zhang, L.; Skibola, C. F.; Rothman, N.; Vermeulen, R.
Abstract:
OMICS technologies are relatively new biomarker discovery tools that can be applied to study large sets of biological molecules. Their application in human observational studies (HOS) has become feasible in recent years due to a spectacular increase in the sensitivity, resolution and throughput of OMICS-based assays. Although, the number of OMICS techniques is ever expanding, the five most developed OMICS technologies are genotyping, transcriptomics, epigenomics, proteomics and metabolomics. These techniques have been applied in HOS to various extents. However, their application in occupational environmental health (OEH) research has been limited. Here, we will discuss the opportunities these new techniques provide for OEH research. In addition we will address difficulties and limitations to the interpretation of the data that is generated by OMICS technologies. To illustrate the current status of the application of OMICS in OEH research, we will provide examples of studies that used OMICS technologies to investigate human health effects of two well-known toxicants, benzene and arsenic.
Citation:
Occup. Environ. Med. 2010, 67 (2):136-143
Journal:
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Issue Date:
Feb-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/113568
DOI:
10.1136/oem.2008.042788
PubMed ID:
19933307
Additional Links:
http://oem.bmj.com/content/67/2/136.long; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2910417/?tool=pubmed
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1470-7926
Sponsors:
This work was performed as part of the work package “integrated risk assessment” of the ECNIS Network of Excellence (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: “Food Quality and Safety” (FOOD-CT-2005-513943).
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVlaanderen, J.en
dc.contributor.authorMoore, L. E.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, M. T.en
dc.contributor.authorLan, Q.en
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L.en
dc.contributor.authorSkibola, C. F.en
dc.contributor.authorRothman, N.en
dc.contributor.authorVermeulen, R.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-20T12:54:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-20T12:54:48Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-
dc.identifier.citationOccup. Environ. Med. 2010, 67 (2):136-143en
dc.identifier.issn1470-7926-
dc.identifier.pmid19933307-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/oem.2008.042788-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/113568-
dc.description.abstractOMICS technologies are relatively new biomarker discovery tools that can be applied to study large sets of biological molecules. Their application in human observational studies (HOS) has become feasible in recent years due to a spectacular increase in the sensitivity, resolution and throughput of OMICS-based assays. Although, the number of OMICS techniques is ever expanding, the five most developed OMICS technologies are genotyping, transcriptomics, epigenomics, proteomics and metabolomics. These techniques have been applied in HOS to various extents. However, their application in occupational environmental health (OEH) research has been limited. Here, we will discuss the opportunities these new techniques provide for OEH research. In addition we will address difficulties and limitations to the interpretation of the data that is generated by OMICS technologies. To illustrate the current status of the application of OMICS in OEH research, we will provide examples of studies that used OMICS technologies to investigate human health effects of two well-known toxicants, benzene and arsenic.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was performed as part of the work package “integrated risk assessment” of the ECNIS Network of Excellence (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: “Food Quality and Safety” (FOOD-CT-2005-513943).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://oem.bmj.com/content/67/2/136.longen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2910417/?tool=pubmeden
dc.subjectArsenicen
dc.subjectBenzeneen
dc.subjectToxicityen
dc.subjectBiological Markersen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Medicineen
dc.subjectGenomicsen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectOccupational Diseasesen
dc.subjectOccupational Medicineen
dc.subjectProteomicsen
dc.subject.meshArsenic-
dc.subject.meshBenzene-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Medicine-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Disease-
dc.subject.meshGenomics-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseases-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Medicine-
dc.subject.meshProteomics-
dc.titleApplication of OMICS technologies in occupational and environmental health research; current status and projections.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalOccupational and Environmental Medicineen

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