Antiapoptotic effects of dietary antioxidants towards N-nitrosopiperidine and N-nitrosodibutylamine-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and HepG2 cells.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/113466
Title:
Antiapoptotic effects of dietary antioxidants towards N-nitrosopiperidine and N-nitrosodibutylamine-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and HepG2 cells.
Authors:
Garcia, Almudena; Morales, Paloma; Arranz, Nuria; Delgado, Ma Eugenia; Rafter, Joseph; Haza, Ana I.
Abstract:
The aim of this work was to determine the effect of vitamin C, diallyl disulfide (DADS) and dipropyl disulfide (DPDS) towards N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) and N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA)-induced apoptosis in human leukemia (HL-60) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. None of the vitamin C (5-50 microm), DADS and DPDS (1-5 microm) concentrations selected induced a significant percentage of apoptosis. In simultaneous treatments, vitamin C, DADS and DPDS reduced the apoptosis induced by NPIP and NDBA in HL-60 and HepG2 cells (around 70% of reduction). We also investigated its scavenging activities towards reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NPIP and NDBA using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in both cell lines. ROS production induced by both N-nitrosamine was reduced to control levels by vitamin C (5-50 microm) in a dose-dependent manner. However, DADS (5 microm) increased ROS levels induced by NPIP and NDBA in HL-60 (40 and 20% increase, respectively) and HepG2 cells (18% increase), whereas DPDS was more efficient scavenger of ROS at the lowest concentration (1 microm) in both HL-60 (52 and 25% reduction, respectively) and HepG2 cells (24% reduction). The data demonstrated that the scavenging ability of vitamin C and DPDS could contribute to inhibition of the NPIP- and NDBA-induced apoptosis. However, more than one mechanism, such as inhibition of phase I and/or induction of phase II enzymes, could be implicated in the protective effect of dietary antioxidants towards NPIP- and NDBA-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and HepG2 cells.
Citation:
J. Appl. Toxicol. 2009, 29 (5):403-413
Journal:
Journal of Applied Toxicology : JAT
Issue Date:
Jul-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10146/113466
DOI:
10.1002/jat.1426
PubMed ID:
19301245
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jat.1426/abstract;jsessionid=E3CB8F8C07A3FCEF94C6EEC851476F49.d01t01
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1099-1263
Sponsors:
This work was supported by grant ALI2002-01033 from the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología (Spain) and by grant 910177 from the Comunidad de Madrid and the Universidad Complutense (UCM). A. García is a recipient of Fellowships from the Universidad Complutense and N. Arranz and M.E. Delgado are recipients from the Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Spain. This work was also partly supported by ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (contract no. 513943).
Appears in Collections:
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Almudenaen
dc.contributor.authorMorales, Palomaen
dc.contributor.authorArranz, Nuriaen
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Ma Eugeniaen
dc.contributor.authorRafter, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorHaza, Ana I.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-19T12:20:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-19T12:20:34Z-
dc.date.issued2009-07-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Appl. Toxicol. 2009, 29 (5):403-413en
dc.identifier.issn1099-1263-
dc.identifier.pmid19301245-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jat.1426-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10146/113466-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this work was to determine the effect of vitamin C, diallyl disulfide (DADS) and dipropyl disulfide (DPDS) towards N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) and N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA)-induced apoptosis in human leukemia (HL-60) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. None of the vitamin C (5-50 microm), DADS and DPDS (1-5 microm) concentrations selected induced a significant percentage of apoptosis. In simultaneous treatments, vitamin C, DADS and DPDS reduced the apoptosis induced by NPIP and NDBA in HL-60 and HepG2 cells (around 70% of reduction). We also investigated its scavenging activities towards reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NPIP and NDBA using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in both cell lines. ROS production induced by both N-nitrosamine was reduced to control levels by vitamin C (5-50 microm) in a dose-dependent manner. However, DADS (5 microm) increased ROS levels induced by NPIP and NDBA in HL-60 (40 and 20% increase, respectively) and HepG2 cells (18% increase), whereas DPDS was more efficient scavenger of ROS at the lowest concentration (1 microm) in both HL-60 (52 and 25% reduction, respectively) and HepG2 cells (24% reduction). The data demonstrated that the scavenging ability of vitamin C and DPDS could contribute to inhibition of the NPIP- and NDBA-induced apoptosis. However, more than one mechanism, such as inhibition of phase I and/or induction of phase II enzymes, could be implicated in the protective effect of dietary antioxidants towards NPIP- and NDBA-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and HepG2 cells.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grant ALI2002-01033 from the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología (Spain) and by grant 910177 from the Comunidad de Madrid and the Universidad Complutense (UCM). A. García is a recipient of Fellowships from the Universidad Complutense and N. Arranz and M.E. Delgado are recipients from the Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Spain. This work was also partly supported by ECNIS (Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility), a network of excellence operating within the European Union 6th Framework Program, Priority 5: ‘Food Quality and Safety’ (contract no. 513943).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jat.1426/abstract;jsessionid=E3CB8F8C07A3FCEF94C6EEC851476F49.d01t01en
dc.subjectAllyl Compoundsen
dc.subjectAntioxidantsen
dc.subjectApoptosisen
dc.subjectCell Culture Techniquesen
dc.subjectHL-60 Cellsen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectLeukemiaen
dc.subjectLiver Neoplasmsen
dc.subjectNitrosaminesen
dc.subjectOxidative Stressen
dc.subjectReactive Oxygen Speciesen
dc.subjectDose-Response Relationshipen
dc.subject.meshAllyl Compounds-
dc.subject.meshAntioxidants-
dc.subject.meshApoptosis-
dc.subject.meshAscorbic Acid-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Hepatocellular-
dc.subject.meshCell Culture Techniques-
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplements-
dc.subject.meshDisulfides-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Drug-
dc.subject.meshHL-60 Cells-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Nick-End Labeling-
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute-
dc.subject.meshLiver Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNitrosamines-
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stress-
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Species-
dc.titleAntiapoptotic effects of dietary antioxidants towards N-nitrosopiperidine and N-nitrosodibutylamine-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and HepG2 cells.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Toxicology : JATen
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